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    DQSBCo. machinery

    The DQSBCo is giving away the engines and other machinery from the Delta King and the Ste. Genevieve to museums in Jeffersonville and Dubuque on a come-and-get-them basis. Negotiations are under weigh to manage this.

    #2
    And so, the question is, why in the world would they do this? What Delta King machinery remained, low pressure cylinder? I wonder what Chief Dennis thinks of this.

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      #3
      Maybe they are doing it to reduce miscellaneous costs, such as storage fees for those engines(?).. Maybe DQSC could borrow the DK hardware back from the museums if they were in dire need for them?

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        #4
        Rumor has it they are going to move out of New Orleans. They probably don't want to have to move and store it.

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          #5
          Steve,

          Most of the stuff is stored in Robin Street Wharf. You can walk around the parking area and the old machinery is stored along the walls.

          Carmen

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            #6
            Yes, I was aware of the Robin Street wharf as the location of most of that stuff, but thought maybe they still had to pay someone to have it there.

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              #7
              Chief Engineer (and museum board member) Kenny Howe is in New Orleans as we speak to examine what "goodies" will be suitable for the Howard Steamboat Museum. Since we recently lost out on one of the WAKEROBIN engines (both went to the museum at Chilo, Ohio) we are pleased to have another chance to obtain a steamboat engine. The museum at Dubuque was given the engines from the Corps of Engineers sternwheel dredge SAINTE GENEVIEVE. So, old steamboat engines are being distributed far and wide -- but we can boast that we are the ONLY steamboat museum to have an excursion boat brig!!!
              Last edited by Keith Norrington; 06-06-2006, 11:51 AM.

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                #8
                It bothers me more than a little that no one here seems to grasp the importance of what the loss of this machinery could mean. No less than the continued operation of the DQ as a steam powered boat is at stake. The cost of storing the stuff is nothing compared to what it would cost to fabricate these parts new, if even possible. Machinery wears out, regardless of how well built it is and the hardware on the DQ is no exception! Better book your trips now no matter the price because without that machinery, the DQ is on borrowed time.

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                  #9
                  There's no verification that those engines are definitely from the DK - several knowledgeable people believe so, and some others mechanically inclined believe they aren't. Many of the DK parts have already been placed on the DQ, like the paddlewheel shaft in '80 and the notorious section of the starboard engine in '54 here in Rock Island after she ran through herself. So you're not looking at a complete set even if it is the authentic twin. Perhaps Chief Dennis can chime in here....

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                    #10
                    No need for panic! If it came to a "life or death" situation where the continued operation and "life" of a steamboat was in jeopardy, I know that the Howard Museum would be more than happy to return whatever part(s) necessary to ensure that steamboating is kept alive and well! If it weren't for other old boats (including the Str. W.P. SNYDER, Jr.) being "organ donors", the BELLE OF LOUISVILLE most likely would NOT be running today!
                    Last edited by Keith Norrington; 06-07-2006, 12:03 PM.

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                      #11
                      Hi Keith,
                      While the generosity and commitment of the Howard Museum cannot be questioned, it troubles me that the DQSCO would knowingly give away equipment which is needed now to ensure the continued operation of the DQ.
                      I refer specifically to the low pressure(port side) cylinder. The original is in an extremely worn condition, the internal bore is both egg and bananna shaped. I gained this knowledge over three years ago and has recently been confirmed. The replacement IS from the Delta King and IS currently in the company's possession. Judy reminds us that the DQ now operates with a number of vital DK parts such as the high pressure cylinder and piston and the wheel shaft and cranks. Had the Stockton CA. shipyard that removed the DK machinery sold or scrapped it in '47 we would not have the DQ sailing today. I'm glad that the Howard Museum would gladly return any parts to ensure that steamboating is kept alive. It would remain, however, for the company to avail itself of the museum's generosity. Would they? I don't know.

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                        #12
                        Is the DQ too small to compete? From the things posted about the new owners attitude toward the DQ, I wonder if they believe the boat can't compete due to it's capacity and approaching mechanical and political problems. If so, that would explain the things they are doing. Or, are they contemplating a switch to diesel power? (What a disaster that would be!)
                        Could a new owner/operator be found to run the DQ profitably as their only boat? Chances are that if American West does sell it they would include in the contract a stipulation that it could not run in competiton with the AQ or MQ. Even worse, could the DQ end up as a cast-aside hulk like others now rusting along the rivers? This is a scary situation, indeed.

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                          #13
                          Life After Death

                          The DQ is too famous a steamboat to end up like some others you allude to. Surely some town, person, or organization would get her a floating muse, etc. This same thought has been in the air since 1970, "What's going to happen to the DELTA QUEEN if she quits running in the overnight trade?" How about us starting another thread and imagine what life for the QUEEN would be like if she's sold by the present owners?

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                            #14
                            DQ Parts

                            Storage and loan of parts from museums to operating properties is not new in the trolley museum world. Two examples come to mind - an arrangement between Seashore Trolley Museum and Boston's transit authority, and similar arrangements between museums in Pennsylvania and Philadelphia's agency. In both cases, cars donated to museums were later returned to service on the transit property. Likwise, Union Pacific pulled a steam locomotive from display to be used as a parts donor for one of its heritage engines. In this case, I think UP kept title to the engine when on display.

                            If I were AI and could move parts inventory to free storage elsewhere, hopefully with strings attached, I'd do it.

                            Wesley

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                              #15
                              Most of this machinery was purchased in the fifties, after a cylinder went out on one of the pistons, if I am not sure. Both engines were built in Germany, and are the exact same, perfectly identical engines. I can't imagine them giving them away. The Engines on the DQ are immaculately kept, but even the whitest teeth can sometime go bad.

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