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    Engine sizes

    Hello all!

    I had a unique question today in the Chart Room. I thought I would post the answer I got from our Engineers in the Engine room since I couldn't find the answer on here.

    What are the sizes of the cylinders on the AMERICAN QUEEN?

    Double Expansion Reciprocating Engines built by Nordberg Engineering, Milwaukee, WI for the US Army Corps of Engineers Dredge KENNEDY in 1932.

    The Low Pressure Cylinder is 30" in Diameter
    The High Pressure Cylinder is 15" in Diameter

    Total horsepower of the set (High and Low Pressure on either side of the wheel) 1500hp.

    Travis
    Last edited by inactive user 02; 06-04-2013, 06:25 PM. Reason: Answer to question

    #2
    If you're on the boat, why don't you mosey down and ask the Chief? ;-)

    Comment


      #3
      I do believe they are 10' stroke...

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        #4
        *KENNEDY'S 10 ft. stroke/Fuel bills*
        Hi, Travis, Bob & Steamboating colleagues:
        Bob, you're probably on the money RE: KENNEDY engines on the boat being 10 ft. stroke. I know I don't know. Capt. Bill Judd may for sure. Interesting question.

        I do know that when Capt. Tom Greene got the first fuel bill for oil to fire his then new DELTA QUEEN, he had a bad case of indigestion--and for good reason. Bigger the engines, more steam; more fuel--more money. Think would it would cost today--if you could get the required oil up to new environmental regulations.

        New technology in using LNG fuel-gas systems coming to reality with new U.S. construction of ocean freighters for 'TOTE Sea Star Line.' Could be applied to the current coal burner SS BADGER on the Lake Michigan run. Bigger may be better, but more expensive. John Burns told me that when the 'California Transportation Co.' received and paid the montly fuel oil bill for both the DK and DQ, the refinery issued a dividend to the stockholders.

        R. Dale Flick
        Coal Haven Landing, Ohio River, Cincinnati

        Comment


          #5
          I believe the KENNEDYS engines were 6 1/2 ft stroke, engine room expert Prudent probably knows the right answer.

          Comment


            #6
            The Chart Room ?

            Hi, what is this........ Chart Room... of which you speak ?


            Randy

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              #7
              Originally posted by Bill Judd View Post
              I believe the KENNEDYS engines were 6 1/2 ft stroke, engine room expert Prudent probably knows the right answer.

              That's a pretty tall order that I'm not too sure about, "engine room expert," but I sure want to thank you for the compliment. Anyway, her Nordberg Engines are six and a half stroke 15, 30's. There are a couple of interesting things about those engines. The high pressure cylinder is aft of the low pressure cylinder, and the piston rod is heavily built and takes up a lot of the area of the high pressure cylinder. Dad wondered aloud once just how much work the high pressure cylinder is doing.

              As far as the Chart Room on the boat, it's a wood panel room forward on the boat where the Riverlorian is kept with their paper copies of well worn Army Corps of Engineers charts. It's a great place to sit and watch the river if it's too cold, wet, or the May flies are out.

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                #8
                Ohhh well now thats just too funny ! I see now the original question was asked inside a real Chart Room, to real engineers. !

                I had forgotten a great deal of you are actual Steam Boat Owners and Operators.... Duhhhh

                I actually thought "The Chart Room" was another web forum or discussion group within this site I had not found yet.....

                Pay no heed to my foolishness... steam along gentlemen.

                Comment


                  #9
                  The AQ's Chart Room

                  Here is the Riverlorian's bailiwick and as someone said, a good place to observe the river inside the boat.
                  Attached Files

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                    #10
                    Hi All
                    I hunter around and found my 1983 article in "Steamboat Bill" about the Dredge Captain Meriwether Lewis. Her propelling engines were built by Marietta Manufacturing Company who also constructed the boat. they were double-compound engines working on 250 pound of steam, the cylinders were 20 inches and 40 inches with a 7 foot stroke. and weighted 29 tons each. they produce 800 horse power and had popin valves and cutoff gear. the vertical triple-compound that drove the dredge pump was built by American Ship Building co or Lorain, Ohio. Her cylinders were 18 inches, 29 inches and 47 1/2 inches with a 20 inch stroke. It developed 1300 Hp on 210 pounds of steam at 160 RPM's there are 39 different steam engines on the boat.

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                      #11
                      Yes, there's still one out there

                      Don't feel badly. I was thinking the same thing. Duh.

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                        #12
                        Randy: You have fallen among captains, pilots, mates,museum curators, historians, writers, riverlorians...most all with some kind of steam experience on DELTA QUEEN, BELLE OF LOUISVILLE, NATCHEZor frequent passengers on steamers over the years or mostly both. They are very generous with their knowledge, experience and, like me, their opinions. Unlike most of them, I have never set foot on a steamer as a paid employee. What I have in common with ALL of them is a deep and abiding love of the subject of long standing. If you are looking for steam smarts, you've come to the right place. I'm glad you have gotten your feet wet with brown water. Many, if not most here, are members of the Sons & Daughters of Pioneer Rivermen (Google it). Unlike the others here, my title is self-appointed. Cap'n Walnut.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Yes and what a group of characters this is indeed!

                          I have to admit.... I came here to find out more about the little Robert Fulton document I find myself selling.... And I did not expect to become so interested in this history but I am finding this early period in American History a total Fascination !

                          I also have to say that after searching in here and other sites, looking again at photographs of these magnificent still surviving, almost surreal looking Steam Boats, with their long inviting decks, the massive circular mechanical arm driven appendages, ornate verticle smoke tubes, luxurious wood interiors, and all with such colorful histories. And then you find this whole "community" of people that surround these boats; Owners and Captains, old world mechanical genius's and craftsmen & women as well as the thousands of patrons from all walks of life who, in some cases, own their own incredible machines.... and all who celebrate steam boats from the largest to the smallest and even the ones that do not float or hold water anymore or are only known to history books........ Very interesting group for sure!

                          It seems a bit of a no brainer to me that someone in this (in some cases "wealthy") always enthusiastic club, should end up owning the wonderful little document I am lucky enough to currently own and am offering for sale. I think this great little "gem of a document" deserves to be proudly displayed by someone of this "Steam Boat Persuasion" on their home wall or ships stateroom or executive office.

                          This item is not terribly valuable to a museum as a document... this letter is more of a snapshot in history... and a beautiful little "neatly packaged" easy to display, historic piece that captures this entire early steam era in this hand written note between two of Early American History's famous men and at that incredible time, partners in a new American venture. For a Steam Boat owner this thing is just over the top as a collectable piece. So far I have recieved some very honorable offers. As much as I love history and would love to see this note end up at a historic site like Clermont or one of the Mississippi or Ohio River Museums... I think another great place would be in the hands of one of the many owners or captains of a steam powered river boat where it will be cherished and cared for as much as my family has.

                          Randy

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by Travis Vasconcelos View Post
                            Double Expansion Reciprocating Engines built by Nordberg Engineering, Milwaukee, WI for the US Army Corps of Engineers Dredge KENNEDY in 1932.

                            Travis
                            The original name of the KENNEDY when she came out of Dravo in July of 1932 was the DUNDEE.

                            Comment

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