Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

A New Kind of Steamboat!

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    A New Kind of Steamboat!

    TWO THINGS:
    #1: While looking at an earlier thread on this site, (which the title eludes me) the discussion was about different ideas on how to manage and effectively operate a steamboat in today's world, be it by tramping, (which was talked about very extensively) overnight stays on the boat or in a hotel, or basing out of one city whilst running two steamers. It also featured photos of a modified 'Creole Queen' dumas model named the 'Ohio Valley.' If anyone knows of this thread, please post a link, because I cannot find it!

    And #2: I would like to follow up this thread, but not about how the company could be managed, but focus on the biggest part of the buisness...the boats themselves! How would you re-design OR re-purpose the western river style of steamboat to be economical, and still relatively cost friendly but still somewhat historically accurate? What are your ideas on how to make a new kind of steamboat!?

    Liam

    #2
    I remember the thread, as I'm the builder of the Ohio Valley (modified Creole Queen) model. Photos attached. The idea behind this model was to come up with a design concept for a modern river dinner cruise or excurson boat that more closely resembled the old-time steamboats. It is essentally the CQ with the upper works modified. I sent photos of the model to the late Alan Bates who paid me a real compliment, saying:: "Thats what she should have looked like". Of course the best example of a modern steamboat that exists today is the Natchez, which proves that a modern steamer can be built that has all the charm and grace of the old boats and still complies with all the safety requirements of a modern boat. As for operating costs, I'm sure that the Natchez is more expensive to operate than the CQ, as the latter is diesel-electric, not steam. As far as my thoughts on how to build a modern steamboat, I again refer to the Natchez. She was designed along the lines of the old packets Queen City & Virginia, two of the most attractive and elaborate sternwheelers built. Most importantly, I feel, she was designed by a person (Alan Bates) who was thoroughly familiar with how the old-timers looked and operated. There is one other person in the US capable of designing modern boats that capture the appearance of the old-timers and that is BIll Preston, of Gulf Breeze, FL. He is probably retired now, but he produced a number of designs for small sternwheelers that were very handsome. I'm not sure that a modern steamboat could be built that was "relatively cost frendly". Anythnig that is steam powered is going to cost more to build and to operate. Perhaps the owners/operators of the steamboats that still run could comment on this. I feel that the most important thing to consider about designing and building a modern riverboat is that it should have the attractive lines and overall appearance of some of the old time boats - enough so that people who see it would want to ride on it. Another good example of an attractive modern sternwheeler is the Julia Belle Swain. Dennis Trone designed her as a "hybred" . She has a modern (1970 vintage) flash steam boiler that generates steam for her two authentic sternwheel engines. The rest of her is powered by a diesel generator in the hull. Thus, when the boat was tied up for any length of time the steam system was shut down and all electrical power was still available from the diesel generator. The flash boiler took only about three minutes to raise a full head of steam when she was ready to leave. I don't know how such a system would work on a larger boat, but it might be worth investigating. Well, those are my thoughts. I hope others more knowledgable than myself will comment on this subject.
    Attached Files

    Comment


      #3
      Size Matters

      The Graceful Ghost is a prime example of making old timey steam work. It is run on scrap lumber and water. To have run that same boat on diesel or gas power would have been prohibitive. It is tiny, so that is the advantage. An even slightly bigger boat would have incurred added expenses. There might be a happy medium in size but I don't know what that is, nor does anyone else, apparently. Bigger boats carry more passengers for the same amount of crew in the engineroom, but we have seen where that can be disastrous in an economic downturn. I, never-the-less think it can be done.

      Comment


        #4
        While logic, reason, and experience tell me a steam-powered vessel is a costly operation to manage in comparison to modern technology, I would still love to see another steamboat built in my time that would follow such graceful lines as we see in the Str. Natchez.
        Last edited by Dan Lewis; 07-30-2012, 01:23 AM. Reason: grammar

        Comment

        ADVERTISEMENT
        Working...
        X