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    MQ nondismantling

    It was pretty evident by the last two pictures we got that the dismantling process on the MQ had stopped. Word is that they reached the engine room and encountered asbestos so stopped. There is asbestos between bulkheads throughout the boat, and they've cut up at least a third of the superstructure already. So now what? I'm flying to NOLA next week and plan to drive over to Belle River/Morgan City to see for myself and get whatever pictures I can. I'd like to find out where the salvaged items they said they were going to auction are, and get info on said auction, if possible. It sounds as if the discovery of the asbestos caught them by surprise... they should have been reading .org!!!

    #2
    All of her interior bulkheads were Marinite Asbestos Paneling. The Delta Queen Steamboat Co. advertised that in the MQ's preconstruction publicity material. I wonder how many unknowing worker tore into those bulkheads while at Perry Street?

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      #3
      at Perry Street

      ...and just think of all the people who wandered around her at Perry after the 'renovating' started... we've seen quite a few interior shots. I expect that the premises will be locked securely at Belle River, and that is fine with me as I have no intention of getting too close. I've got a 10x zoom which will be just fine! And remember the Baton Rouge TV video of the workmen merrily pulling down the dining room ceiling without any protective gear? I wonder if the presence of asbestos was passed down from owner to owner, and if not, when did it stop?

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        #4
        Rocket Science

        I'm not a rocket scientist, nor have I played one on TV, but if I were in the dismantling business, I'd for sure have checked if there was asbestos anywhere on that boat! This should have been done before the first cutting torch was lit. Unbelieveable...

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          #5
          Profit in Scraping

          Whatever profit there was in tearing the Mississippi Queen to bits, it is gone now. I coordinated a couple of contracts for asbestos abatement. This process is not CHEAP. Plus it takes a life of its own when the product is broken and airborn.

          The word to remember here is OSHA.

          What is the Chinese word for OOOOPS?

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            #6
            Thanks Mark

            Thanks Mark for that little bit of humor in such a sad situation! It does boggle the mind though to think that maybe this possibility wasn't considered even before the purchase. And since many of us on this little old message board knew about the existence of asbestos there, it was obviously not a top secret... Now I'm wondering how the rest of it will get disposed, and when, and who will pay for it? I'm thinking we taxpayers may somehow end up footing the bill in the name of safety in an American town...

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              #7
              A-word

              Shades of SS Norway.......maybe MQ will be towed to India. The presences of asbestos certainly explains in part why the renovation stopped. But I am suprised asbestos was still used in the 1970s.

              Wesley

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                #8
                Asbestos still used in the 70's...? When the DELTA QUEEN went into Avondale Shipyard in 1971 and new, or repaired, steam auxillary equipment was installed in the lower pump room, a specialilty crew was working full time behind the mechanics insulating the equipment with what looked like plaster casts made for broken limbs. Was it asbestos... so we were told, and assumed, it was.

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                  #9
                  Well, hold the phone now. I just checked and Marinite is not made of asbestos. So they must be talking about something else that is asbestos. Asbestos pretty much fell into disuse around 1972. It's dangers were known well before that. And by the way, have any of you that have worked in a shipyard been tested for mesothelioma?

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                    #10
                    Engine Room

                    The dismantling had reached the engine room, so I assume that is where they ran into asbestos, at least knowingly...

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                      #11
                      hmmmm did it say how long its dormant Lexie? I actually did work in a shipyard in NOLA for a while in 75, American Marine, which may have become Boland, not sure. I also spent several layups in Avondale and Boland. Never really thought about it til now.

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                        #12
                        Much bigger chance of cancer if you smoked too. Company could not require you to quit smoking...go figure. Asbestos ranks right up there with lead abatement in being a public rip-off the way it is often administrated. Asbestos is NOT a hazardous waste and may be disposed in ordinary landfills under prescribed conditions. Cap'n Walnut.

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                          #13
                          The annoying commercial did not specify when you worked at the shipyard. I had a friend who worked in industry for years and he said they wouldn't know the difference if he smoked as well. Since he smoked as well, he never got the test. I never smoked and did work at a shipyard, so I have contemplated getting tested. The thing is, I never knowingly was around asbestos and it was well after 1972. If you call the # on the commercial, it will probably connect you to a lawyer and doctor who will see to it that you have mesothelioma. I was probably around more asbestos in my father's office building than in any shipyard.

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                            #14
                            Mesothelioma

                            A friend of mine died from mesothelioma a few years ago. He worked for Northern States Power Company for nearly 30 years. The problem with asbestos is that when it is ground up, the airborne particles that are breathed in over several years are what causes the cancer. Sheets of asbestos that are insulating pipes or other static uses in and of itself doesn't cause cancer. It's the long-term exposure to the airborne particulate.

                            If anyone worked in a shipyard and was exposed long-term to ground asbestos, they should get the test - because you are at a higher risk. If you had a low or occasional exposure, you should be okay - though if someone in your family has a higher pre-disposition to coming down with cancer, it would also be highly advisable.

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                              #15
                              I think Jeffery is absolutely correct in his information. How many of us watched a worker doing a brake job on our car. When the wheel came off, the brake drum had a handfull of asbestos dust in it which was soon sent aloft with a blast from an air hose! Asbestos is no longer in brake shoes, I think, but the mechanics were exposed for many years AFTER the hazard was known. I have seen photos of ships being loaded in Canada with asbestos back in the "good ol' daze" and the only thing visible through the asbestos dust was the tops of the masts! J/M made a material called Transite with asbestos (cement reinforced with asbestos) that was sold extensively for ship's bulkheads as between staterooms...this in response to the terrible fire in the MORO CASTLE ship many years ago. Transite no longer contains asbestos but if you have an old ship...Cap'n Walnut

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