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A pictorial 'answer'

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    A pictorial 'answer'

    Ron had a thread "A Question" regarding steam emanating from the hull. Several people gave him the answers in words. Here are a couple of pictures of this phenomenon on the steamer NATCHEZ as she made a landing approach in the late 1980s. The steam is coming from 40 or 50 ft. from the stern although it looks like it is coming from the forward end at this angle. I have much better shots of steam rushing out as we were working condensate out pretrips, but of course can't find them now. That is Doc Hawley on the wingbridge, and note the original tall stacks with the double spreader bars. The stacks were shortened for Tall Stacks (oxymoronic isn't that) 2006 and one spreader bar was removed.
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    #2
    Yeah, That's it.

    It is also viable emanating from the stern hull area ever so little from the docked stern wheeler in the left foreground of the following picture.

    It looks best downloaded and zoomed up big.

    http://www.steamboats.org/forum/atta...amboat-pic.jpg

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      #3
      Great pictures Judy! The steam coming from the stbd. side of the Natchez is from the boiler blowdown discharge. There is a surface blowdown to skim impurities etc. off of the boiler water surface. There is also a bottom blowdown and they both discharge out the same piping on the stbd. side aft of the boiler room. This is the only discharge for any steam on the stbd. side. The exhaust steam from the engines is condensed. Although there is an "emergency" engine exhaust for the steam engines (in the event of a failure of the condensing system) at the transom fwd of the paddlewheel. The bilge system is all electric pumps with no steam syphons....I miss the Natchez(: Those were the good ole' days.

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