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photos of the New Orleans model.

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    photos of the New Orleans model.

    It is ready to run and all the lakes are frozen. Guess i'll wait a few months.Click image for larger version

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    #2
    Mike,

    Looks great! Nice work. I don't know that John Fryant ever responded about the river event in Marietta in August but I am sure there is room on the pond for your model. I'm looking forward to seeing all the models that show up.

    Thanks for sharing the photos of your new model.

    Aaron Richardson
    Cincinnati

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      #3
      Looks great! Hope that you can post a video or link of her running once the ice melts. Good luck.

      Pete Baker
      Fulton's Followers

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        #4
        a few more photos.

        Click image for larger version

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ID:	62082 The cool thing about the model is that it runs on just 1 D size battery.

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          #5
          Mike,

          Thats a nice model and its neat that it runs on only one D battery. HOWEVER - In the interest of historical accuracy - What you have there is a model of the replica that was built in 1911 for the centennial of the 1811 voyage. The replica looked NOTHING like the original boat and I don't know who came up with the idea of building it that way. The original New Orleans looked a lot like Fulton's so caled "Clermont" of 1807, and several of his other early boats such as the "Rariton" of 1809. So what you have is a replica of the replica. It'll be welcome at the Waterways Festival on Aug 6 - 7.

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            #6
            John,
            From the beginning of this project I figured it wasn't a replica of the 1811 boat but wasn't 100% sure. Alot of people posted comments on here about the subject and I have come to the conclusion that it is a replica of a replica. I choose it because I thought it would make a cool model and I had never seen anyone duplicate it before. Thank you to everyones comments and hope to see you at the event.

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              #7
              Mike: I agree with John' comments as to the nice model you have made and the opinion that it is not very close to the original. In my opinion, none of us can know what the original looked like but my research tells me that the most faithful representation is the US Postage stamp issued in 1959. If interested, you should be able to find it on the internet. Cap'n Walnut

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                #8
                *RE: NEW ORLEANS model*
                Hi, Mike & Steamboating colleagues:
                Nice piece of work along with great comments from others above. As Cap'n Walnut said nobody knows what the real NO looked like and, I guess, a model of the 1911 boat good as any.

                The art, skill, talent, dedication in doing such model work beyond my dismal ability with fumbling hands, lack of patience. How model builders like John Fryant, Mike, Pete Baker etc. do it a marvel to my eyes. I stand in awe viewing the incredible 'Crabtree' models on display at Mariner's Museum in Virginia with magnifying lenses on the display cases to enlarge his fantastic hand work, carving. Crabtree went so far as to weave his own sails, braid his lines by hand. If Crabtree did a model of, say, a 15th century galleon, he'd seek out wood of the same type and age from Europe to lend authenticity. John Fryant and I often comment that models should be 'aged' or left outside in the weather for that really honest look of them as vessels in their working career. One model expert said he grew weary of pristine models in glass cases. OUCH! Those fine paint jobs when a vessel left the yards soon besmirched with coal dust, rain, weather, cargo, animals being on and off-loaded. Well, what do I know?

                R. Dale Flick
                Coal Haven Landing, Ohio River, Cincinnati.

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                  #9
                  Great point on the weathered look. I have thought about it myself when it comes to all my models. Adding the scraps and rust and other wear and tear sure does make it realistic but its something i'll have to work at learning. My first try would look like I beat the living crap out of it so maybe someday. I think most of us find it odd that they built a replica with such little knowledge of what the original looked like but I guess it was to celabrate the anniversary no matter what the boat looked like. I'm glad it turned out the way it did because if the anniversary boat looked more like the Clermont then i'm not sure I would have built it. I really appriciate all the nice comments.

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