Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Pilothouse to engineroom communication

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    #16
    Cap Bates,

    Your story reminds me of a story I heard once about a cub pilot on a diesel sternwheeler (direct reversing engine up forward), where the engineer had double doors up front much like the BARBARA H. The engineer would watch out those doors when making tow and just ease the boat right up to the barges. Everyone on shore thought the young cub was doing a good job of handling the boat but truth be told he never had rang a bell and that old engineer'd be backing her down to keep from thumping the barges. I think the story ends with the cub buying the engineer a big bottle for Christmas for making him look good.

    Thanks for sharing from your BOL experiences.

    Aaron

    Comment


      #17
      Hey Steve,

      Interesting stuff. Much like electric lights coming to the river I'll bet somewhere it's noted (probably argued) about which boat had a telegraph first.

      Thanks for that info!

      Aaron

      Comment


        #18
        Speaking of marks on the dock, on the MINNE, we dock in a slip, bow nosed into the dock, with 3 sets of wooden pile-ons on each side. Since our engine room is glass-enclosed, one of our engineers has it to where once they ring down the second "Stop" bell in the sequence "Standby, Slow Ahead, Stop, Full Astern, Stop" when landing, he can see out the windows to the location of the third pile-on is (where we have our stern line) and bring the boat in perfectly as to not bump the bow on the rubber bumper too hard. Fine tuning is done with the thrusters by the pilots in the wheelhouse.
        Attached Files

        Comment


          #19
          Read all about it in A Riverman's Lexicon by Capt. Charles Lehman.

          Comment

          ADVERTISEMENT
          Working...
          X