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What Would Capt. Jim Do?

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    What Would Capt. Jim Do?

    What would Capt Jim do if he were trying to build boats today with all the govt. regulations? Looking at the picture he took of the INDIANA outfitting there are all kinds of safety violations which would have shut him down if an OSHA inspector had happened by back in 1901.
    1. man working on the jack staff. No safety harness, sitting on guy wires...oh my, the man was lucky to have made it through the day.
    2. man working under the stairs. No hand rails and he's working over water, no life jacket. No guard on the stairs to keep people off.
    3. stair way from the Texas to the Hurricane roof. No hand rails of any kind and at the end to the stairs there's a fire hose pipe, someone could fall into it.
    (I love these Howard photos, they are so clear you can enlarge them so big that details like these become evident.)
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    #2
    Impossible in 2010

    Boy oh boy, Jim. Ain't that the truth. No one would be allowed to build an historically accurate steamboat of yesteryear. Too bad.

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      #3
      Ted,
      anybody with the materials and experience could build an exact replica of the Indiana. The only thing is, he would not be allowed to use it. A couple of times each year I get calls from people wanting to build the Rob't. E. Lee. I listen patiently and explain why they cannot. For some reason I also get calls from people who want to make millions hauling coal out of Kentucky River. They seem disappointed when I tell them that in a week they can haul less coal than CSX moves in two hours. Then there's the guy down there on the Wabash who wants to. . . .

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        #4
        Oddly enough Alan I was floating the James river in Va. yesterday in my Kayak with some friends and like most rivers the James has its share of track running along side as well as a few tressles and I dont believe I've ever floated without seeing at least one train and yesterday was no exception as I counted 97 CSX cars on one of the 2 trains I saw..... "well I'm sorry my son but your too late in askin', Mr. Peabody's Coal Train has hauled her away".

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          #5
          Why not? People still do all that dangling around on the numerous sailing ships that still exist. They wear safety harnesses, but there are many occasions where the harness can't be used.

          There was a deck hand on the DQ that shinnied up the mast one day like a monkey, did what he had to do, and came back down before someone else could track down a ladder.

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            #6
            And don't forget a certain someone who managed to not miss the boat by swimming out and riding the DQ's anchor.

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              #7
              Why, Captain Jim would do like the rest of us, resent it, complain, then go on with the work.

              It is kind of interesting - the writers and enforcers of such organizations as OSHA and the Department of Homeland Security have no comprehension of costs, excepting, of course, when they must pay them from their own wallets. They cannot grasp the idea that steel lying idle for months while the department makes up its mind is a direct expense to whoever needs the steel. They cannot believe that it is more economical for a boat owner and a shipyard to proceed without approval than to wait a couple of months for a decision. It is often less costly to tear down completed work and rebuild it than to wait for some bureaucrat to reply to a letter.

              Captain Jim never faced this problem, but if he did he would do what the rest do: go ahead and build, then worry about the nit-picking complaints when they finally arrive.

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