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A couple DQ tidbits..

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    #16
    Regarding our toilet water: we sure could tell where we were by its color. I loved departure days from St. Louis - newcomers could be heard flushing and flushing their toilets, thinking they hadn't been flushed yet. Since we were a few miles below the confluence of the muddy Missouri and Mississippi, St. Louis was certainly a 'brown water' town. One other interesting place was Greenville Mississippi. Enroute we of course had brown water from Ol' Miss, but Greenville is on Lake Ferguson, which has clear water. So when we were docked in Greenville, our water was clear. Back on the river, it went back to brown.

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      #17
      Oh yeah, Sam, I've had Ed come out and tell me more than once to "Shut that off!!!"

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        #18
        Phillip, at least one of the lifeboats seemed to remain with the ol' gal during her early days with Greeneline. I'm assuming it is one of the same boats as the original eight (8) lifeboats, looks the same to me. See below a picture I nicked from an eBay listing, I'm thinking at the latest very early 50's here, someone please correct me if I'm nuts. Notice the very, VERY early Greeneline oval style shorty stack with the G over dark green before they started adding round stack extensions at the top to solve the, ahem, fallout problem.

        Also no calliope and the subsequent circus fru-fru, no wingbridges, no wingbridge stairs, lots of funnel ventilators and I'm not sure I'm seeing any searchlights, either... other than the one I think was on the kingpost at the time...lots of windows on the main deck that are now gone, too. And I'll bet dime to donuts the paddlewheel is either black or dark green in this postcard.
        Attached Files

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          #19
          So her wheel wasn't always red in GL service? I know it was black in CA when under the cover, but just assumed it was red once the Green's started running her. There's another one Bruno...any of the old stacks get saved? I know a lot of times as things get removed from ships (or boats in our case), crew members would save them for themselves if possible as souviners. Any of her old stacks survive the times?

          Interesting note about her original lifeboats, they were supported by Welin brand davits, this is the same company who made the too few for the Titanic and Olympic. Part of one still remains on the Delta King displayed on the main deck in the forward lobby.

          It appears as tho the Greene's left space enough for two boats on her in many of the early photos I have seen, yet I have never seen both boats in place, just the forward one. Interesting to look at deck plans and compare the King and Queen to each other today and then to their original layouts.

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            #20
            Hi, Phillip. We discussed the wheel/splashboard/stack extensively in a thread back in March of this year. Read all about it:

            http://www.steamboats.org/forum/stea...education.html

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              #21
              Wingbridges, yes

              Here are 2 more photos from that Lodder series, Bruno. There are wingbridges but you can't really tell from the angle of the pix you posted. The bridges were accessed by walking out a door in the rear of the pilothouse to the roof and onto the bridges. I believe that stage is from the GCG, but the pix is prior to her retirement in 1952. In the night shot, check out the car on the bow. I'm guessing that might be Mrs. Greene's, as she often rode the first night of a trip and then drove back to Cincinnati. Also, I think I can see the pilotwheel in the night shot, right?
              Attached Files

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                #22
                Here's another one, courtesy of Capt Gabe through Keith Norrington to me. This is Pittsburgh 1958, and I'm 99% sure this was the exact moment I went aboard to visit as a 5 year old, I even remember boarding on the starboard side, assuming she visited Pittsburgh only once in 1958... anyways...Notice how the stack is starting to grow in height. It sorta looks like the oval lower stack is still below it.

                John Mullen called me about my earlier photo and this photo shows the same thing or this case lack of something. Where are the outside stairs from the Texas down to the Cabin Deck? And next question, obviously, when were the stairs added.

                Phillip, as you walk on the Texas deck you can still see the rounded roof beams where the Cabin deck was either originally notched out to accommodate the lifeboats, the cutout since filled in with deck and handrail, or this rounded beam was the structure to hold the lifeboats in place.

                Judy, thanks for the great pics...in your pics the searchlights are obvious, I knew that didn't make sense...other things I find interesting in these pictures: no chain handrails on the stages, windpowered turbine ventilators instead of available powered fans for bathroom exhaust, no air conditioning for the "observation lounge" and other spaces (Orleans?). All is equipment that now clutters the roof. Also no light mast above the pilothouse...
                Last edited by Bruno Krause; 07-20-2008, 09:39 PM.

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                  #23
                  The chain handrails on the stage appeared in the late '80's or early '90's. I always thought they were silly, as that stage is so wide. All that stuff up on the roof was added piece by piece over the years in response to the desire for better air conditioning, galley ventilation, etc. The crew quarters were originally not air conditioned; that changed in the early 1970's when the crew quarters were rebuilt as semi-private rooms (2 to a room) rather than larger bunkrooms (all deckhands together, all waiters together, etc.) Shipyard Sam can expound on that. The new crew quarters were air conditioned with a chilled water system and individual fan units in the rooms. These worked pretty well except when they were pre-heating the fuel oil (#6 oil) right under where you were.

                  The Texas Deck to Cabin Deck outside stairs are there; they are recessed within the jutted-out Cabin Deck at the point where it gets wider aft of the Forward Cabin Lounge; the Purser's Office and Gift Shop are under these stairs.

                  Now I am going to attempt to describe the stack from the early '60's thru about 2000. I wish I had a photo to post showing all this, but I don't: the stack had a jacket that was oval in shape that came up from the Sun Deck roof. At the top of that there was a lip that shed rain water. Above that lip was the stack top, which was also oval in shape, and sat atop the stack base. This top part could be removed, but only accompanied by a lot of work and cussing. To do it involved getting up on a ladder and fishing a small hook into a pad eye inside the stack top. This was done while hot gases were hitting you in the face, and the hook and eye were pretty small. You'd better hope they didn't let her soot up while you were doing it. A small crane was there to raise the stack top high enough to clear the aforementioned lip, and then you could swing the top over and set it on the deck....about a 2 or 3 hour job. The new stack (much as I dislike the looks) is designed to be able to be lowered easily by one person, and if I were still the person responsible for getting it down, I'm sure i would love it.

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                    #24
                    Notice between this photo and Judy's photo she lost the center column combining two windows into one larger one on the wheelhouse. I always liked the looks of the smaller windows, waffled paneled walls and aft wings, but as far as functionality goes, the new ones are much better I'm sure. Also for the stack being mentioned, I was on the roof of her in Louisville one time, we were gathering info for a model we were building so we walked the boat with paper and tape measure in hand. One thing they let us do to get the "new" stack dimensions (as it was very new at the time) was drop it down to get a diameter measurement. All it took was a little tug and down it came rather easily, then to put it back up, simply ease the rope and up it goes. They got the counterweights just right on that one!

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                      #25
                      Judy,

                      The stage was built for the DELTA QUEEN and was a mirror image of the one on the GORDON. However, it proved too short and was replaced with the style of stage she carries today. The stage on her now is new, as of 1997.

                      I noticed for the first time the rigging of the stage mast (Kingpost) is singled on either side. I looked at a few older pics of her and when the stage changed to the style we know now, it appears the extra bracing was added at that time. I have never noticed this feature in other pictures of this era.

                      The night shot is excellent and you can see the pilot wheel in the pilothouse! Wow!

                      But where is she landed? Mrs. Greene did ride the first night out alot. Usually that was from Cincinnati. This being the case, one would think Louisville, or Madison, IN. However, the angle of the stage definatley puts those two towns out of the running, for in the ear of this photograph, both had cobblestone grade wharves...and this is definately a concrete esplanade. My guess (and it is totally a guess), based on the lights to the stern of the vessel creating a crescent, is New Orleans (in high water obviously). Any one else have a guess?

                      ~Travis~

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                        #26
                        As far as I can remember the paddlewheel was always red, my first trip on the boat was in 1953. Probably when that postcard was made, the wheel was painted with red lead paint...that's what they used back then. Also to those "old timers" painting the wheel was not a high priority, look at pictures of the GORDON C. GREENE or the AVALON back in that time period.

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                          #27
                          The Car in Night Shot

                          The car in the night shot appears to be the famous VW. Look at the silhouette.

                          Wesley

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                            #28
                            The big, HEAVY stage that the DQ carried for years was built by Marion Frommel. Capt. Ernie Wagner told me once that he absolutely HATED that stage and that it wouldn't hurt his feelings if it was lost overboard!

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                              #29
                              From what I have gathered all pumping and all airconditioning is done with electricity now and no cooking is done with steam, correct? But, I gotta believe the lists above are not complete, please embelish.[/QUOTE]

                              Great subject! The Galley uses steam for the dishwasher, steam table, steamer and soup kettle. I have wished for that huge supply of steam many a time on other boats.

                              I can't remember whether the steam table in the crew mess uses live steam or not.

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                                #30
                                Keith,

                                In the crew mess on the DELTA QUEEN the steam from the main boilers is used.

                                ~Travis~

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