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    Cape Cod Light/Cape May Light

    The Redhead and I judged a BBQ Contest in Green Cove Springs, FL this weekend. It was located in a park on the riverfront there. Immediately adjacent to the park was a concrete pier and tied to the pier were the Cape Cod Light and Cape May Light. Locals told us they had been tied up there for "five or six" years with no apparent work being done on them. One of them appeared to be finished. It had windows etc. The other was boarded up and looked really rough. The outstanding feature on each of the ships was the Name plate and Golden Eagle mounted over the pilot house.

    Bear

    #2
    A quick Google turned up the following:

    host website: http://www.maritimematters.com/deltaqueenCV.html

    "Delta Queen Coastal Voyages

    Update:
    The line's first newbuild, CAPE MAY LIGHT, was to be joined by sister vessel CAPE COD LIGHT in April, 2002, but in October, 2001 American Classic Voyages declared bankruptcy.



    Delta Queen Coastal Voyages, (American Classic Voyages)

    On June 9, 2000, the first hull for American Classic Voyages new fleet of coastal ships was successfully launched at Atlantic Marine, Inc., in Jacksonville, Florida.

    The newly built ships of Delta Queen Coastal Voyages are modeled after the celebrated vessels that traveled the coastlines of New England during the golden age of coastal cruising. These elegant coastal vessels, had all but disappeared by the early 1900s. Now a hundred years later their will return to the coastal towns ushering in a new golden age on the coast.

    The cv CAPE MAY LIGHT and the cv CAPE COD LIGHT, are "classically" designed coastal vessels featuring rich, New England Federal decor with 114 staterooms each.

    The CAPE MAY LIGHT the first of the two 226-passenger ships was built at Atlantic Marine and began sailing nine itineraries along the U.S. East Coast in spring 2001.

    Update: American Classic Voyages files Bankrupcy
    October 19, 2001: American Classic Voyages, Inc. has filed for bankruptcy court protection and will cease most sailings. In Hawaii, SS INDEPENDENCE and MS PATRIOT will stop sailing on Saturday, October 20 after completing current cruises. The Delta Queen Vessels AMERICAN QUEEN, MISSISSIPPI QUEEN, COLUMBIA QUEEN and CAPE MAY LIGHT will stop sailing over the next three days. A fifth Delta Queen steamboat, the historic DELTA QUEEN, will continue to operate its Mississippi River voyages. American Classic said that of its bookings had fallen off since the terrorist attacks on September 11 and cancellations had risen to 30 percent. Rumors the company was in financial trouble had circulated for weeks and on Thursday, Nasdaq officials halted trading in American Classic's shares after they reached a new low of 46 cents each. Two weeks ago, insurers stopped offering polices for American Classic passengers wanting insurance against cruise cancellations. The move discouraged travel agents from booking passengers on the company's ships. American Classic has on order two new, 1,900-passenger ships under a planning stage at the Ingalls shipyard in Mississippi. The company said it hopes to work out a deal with Los Angeles based Northrop Grumman Corp., owner of the shipyard, and the U.S. Maritime Administration to keep the ship-building projects underway.

    Both coastal cruisers, CAPE MAY LIGHT completed in 2001 and CAPE COD LIGHT in 2002, were withdrawn from service following the financial collapse of American Classic Voyages; they remained laid up in Florida, for sale.

    August 21, 2007: CAPE MAY LIGHT and CAPE COD LIGHT, laid up since the collapse of American Classic Voyages in 2001, have been bought by Hornblower Marine Services. Details on future deployment and operation to be announced.

    Delta Queen Coastal Voyages Vessels:

    C.V. CAPE MAY LIGHT C.V. CAPE COD LIGHT"


    There are a couple of earlier threads on these two vessels.

    PRB
    Last edited by Pete Baker; 09-30-2007, 07:09 PM.

    Comment


      #3
      It has been rumored that MAL was or is interested in both of them. This is just a rumor among employees.

      I was on the Cape May as an employee when AMCV filed bankruptcy . Its a darn shame. She is a great looking ship and I would love to see her sail again.

      They where both for sale on yachtworld.com but I can only find the cape may on their now.

      Its odd. You said the other was all boarded up, but the photos I posted from the company selling it look like its complete.
      Attached Files

      Comment


        #4
        Hi Donald,

        Perhaps I wasn't totally clear. The windows on what looked like the public rooms on the first and second open decks were boarded. The bridge and the cabins appeared to have windows. The Cape Cod Light was tied port side to the pier and the Cape May Light was tied starboard side to the pier.

        How did they sail? It looks to me like they wouldn't deal with rough weather well -narrow beam, shallow draft (11-12') and high sides. I sort of felt like I owned a door knob or something on each of them since I had stock in DQSC when it went under. Oh well.

        Bear

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by Bear View Post
          Hi Donald,

          Perhaps I wasn't totally clear. The windows on what looked like the public rooms on the first and second open decks were boarded. The bridge and the cabins appeared to have windows. The Cape Cod Light was tied port side to the pier and the Cape May Light was tied starboard side to the pier.

          How did they sail? It looks to me like they wouldn't deal with rough weather well -narrow beam, shallow draft (11-12') and high sides. I sort of felt like I owned a door knob or something on each of them since I had stock in DQSC when it went under. Oh well.

          Bear
          Bear I understand now.

          To answer your question about how She (Cape May) sailed. Well......... Lets say I watched many people get ill while crossing Lake Ontario . She was not the most stable of ships when you added a little rough water. Being a small ship there was no sort of stabilizers .

          There was also a few design flaws that most of us did not understand. One such flaw was the fact that the dining room was directly above the engine room. So come dinner time the Capt usually needed to ease back on the power a bit or the plates and silverware would rattle off the tables.

          Its really a shame. We didnt make it through our first season before AMCV closed up shop.

          Comment

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