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    #31
    Hines

    Shipyard it is that same Producers, after Hines it went to Capt. Gene Bartley out of Pittsburgh, then to Charles Grimm and then to Capt. Williard Chaplin of Sardis, Oh. towing on the Great Kanawha.

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      #32
      That was some boat-- ya could hear it coming for a mile, maybe more. The Captain and his family lived aboard with their laundry flapping on the clothesline on the aft end of the second deck. A real great boatman. The crew of the P. A. DENNY loved it whenever the PRODUCERS passed.
      Last edited by Shipyard Sam; 08-26-2007, 01:51 PM.

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        #33
        John J. Kelly

        I am posting a photograph of the John J. Kelly towing the Gulf barge Franklin. The location is at Chimney Rock Bluff on the Kentucky River. The tow is empty, having just unloaded at Camp Nelson, KY, and is en-route to North Bend, Ohio. The photographer was Tankerman Walter Berry, of the Gulf Marine Dept. The photograph was taken in the summer of 1945.
        Attached Files

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          #34
          I just got to reading this thread on Hines, Inc. My mother was a Hines from KY, family lived around the Green River and Bowling Green and basically settled Western KY. I understand that Duncan Hines was some sort of cousin. I wonder if this Hines is not a relative. I would love to know more about the names of the Hines that this company was named for.

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            #35
            Hi, Virginia. As this thread has progressed, I had hoped someone would give us or direct us to a comprehensive history of the Hines family. I can give a very little bit of the history, but know next to nothing compared to many on this board. I do know that the Hines organizationn was headquartered for many years in Bowling Green, and their operations towing oil and oil products and by-products eventually extended beyond the Green River in Kentucky to the Lower Mississippi River and the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway. They owned a number of powerful towboats for their lower river work, which consisted in the latter days of going to refineries in Texas on the Gulf Coast (via the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway) to load various pertoleum and petrochemical products for Ohio River ports. Several years ago, they sold out to American Commercial Barge Lines, which created a subsidiary they named Hines America Line. I believe that entity has now been wholly absorbed by A.C.L. and is now operated by them.

            You mentioned Duncan Hines, and many, if not most, people are familiar with that name. There was a towboat named DUNCAN L. HINES, owned and operated by Hines, Inc. but it is not the Mississippi/Ohio River towboat that makes the name familiar to most Americans -- it is the cake mix of the "Duncan Hines" name. Here is my understanding of how the cake mix got its name, and I am ready and willing to be corrected on any and all points or details of this story: Duncan Hines was quite the traveller (maybe as a businessman) in the early 20th century. Mr.Hines was quite disappointed in most of the lodgings and restaurants he found in his travels, and began keeping a personal journal of good places to stay and places to get a good meal while travelling. He gave this information to friends and acquaintances, and over the years became somewhat famous for his rating system and list of good lodgings and restaurants. At some point, Mr. Hines was persuaded to publish this work, and so the "Duncan Hines" stamp of approval became very widely respected. As the years progressed, and as World War II ended and ordinary folks began to travel more, there was also a new invention called a "cake mix", which had all the dry ingredients for baking a cake pre-measured and in one package. There were several companies that were marketing these new mixes, with limited success, chiefly due to the fact that many people felt a "mix" could be nowhere near as good as a home-made cake. The makers of one of these mixes decided that a respected name on their product would enhance sales. Duncan Hines was approached with this idea, and after trying the end product of this mix, did indeed put his stamp of approval on the mix, and it was named "Duncan Hines". Mr. Hines's reputation as a vetter of good foods was the key to the mix's success.

            This Duncan Hines is the same Duncan Hines for whom the towboat was named, and he was a member of the Kentucky oil transport and boating family.

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              #36
              Hines

              In regards to the names of the Hines river operations people here are the names, generation by generation. James R. Hines, James G. Hines and Warren W. Hines ( brothers and sons of James R. Hines). Actually the history goes back into the Bowling Green & Evansville Packet Co., owned by the Williams brothers. Ida Mae Williams married Jett W. Hines. Capt. Bob Reynolds has it right on Duncan Hines who was a cousin to James R. Hines.

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                #37
                Thanks. I have lots of James Hines on the tree. I also have several Warren W. Hines running loose on the same tree. I imagine they are cousins, several times removed as my family are all from that part of the country. I haven't found James R. Hines yet, but bet he was there somewhere as my direct line had a brother who died in a Brittish prison camp named James and the family keeps family names going.

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                  #38
                  John J Kelly

                  The bow on picture of the Hines Zephyr, John J. Kelly and Billy shows them laying at the old Steamboat Landing in Bowling Green, Ky at Mile 30 (Head of Navigation) on Barren River. That is indeed the John J. Kelly as the center boat in the picture.
                  The Picture of the John J. Kelly with the Gulf Oil Barge was made at mile 29.5, Gulf Oil Dock on Barren River.
                  My father was with Hines for 50 years and I grew up on the boats of Hines, Inc. I rode those boats many a time plus working after I became of age when schools was out.
                  Barry Griffith

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                    #39
                    Hines History

                    My father was with Hines for 50 years and I litterally grew up on and working on the boats after I became of age for a period of time.
                    A good synopsis of the Hines family tree and evolution can be found on this website. This is the next generation of the Hines family to enter the river~ the grandson of James G. Hines--A very progressive and talented young man, --Kent Furlong.

                    HFL, Inland Tank Barges, Bareboat Charters, Chlorine Barges, Pressure Barges, Ammonia Barges
                    Tab over to the "about us" for the history section.

                    Feel free to contact me and I will try to assist with any questions you may have.
                    Barry
                    timberhead@insightbb.com

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                      #40
                      Gulf Oil Dock, Camp Nelson on the Kentucky River

                      Here is the Camp Nelson Gulf Oil Terminal also included is the R. W. Turner that towed into the Gulf Oil Terminals. My grandfather Capt. D. L. Griffith was the Captain on her.
                      Barry
                      Attached Files

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                        #41
                        Originally posted by Shipyard Sam View Post
                        That was some boat-- ya could hear it coming for a mile, maybe more. The Captain and his family lived aboard with their laundry flapping on the clothesline on the aft end of the second deck. A real great boatman. The crew of the P. A. DENNY loved it whenever the PRODUCERS passed.
                        Attached is a picture of the Producers at the Bowling Green Boatlanding on Barren River. I too enjoyed the sound of her chugging up the river.
                        Barry--
                        Attached Files

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                          #42
                          The Producers was a nice looking boat. It has the lines of a sternwheeler, but was built at Howard in 1928 as a single screw towboat. I got my copy of "From Paddlewheels To Propellers" out, and found some info on it. It was originally named the J.J. Hennen. Howards promoted the fact that it was built with their patented flanking rudders. The Hennen brothers ran into trouble when the Depression hit, and Howard had to repossess the boat. Howard finally sold it again in 1934 for $16,500, about two-thirds its value.

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