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    If the Bill Passes

    I just realized that if the bill passes as written, her Majesty will only be able to run one year (I think) as the ol' gal we all love; after that, 10% of her will be changed and 10% each year after that until she is completely changed. The reason I said she'll get one year as the boat we know, I'm assuming they won't have to begin replacing combustible material until after the first operating season. I wonder if the Coast Guard will allow her to keep the beautiful wood paneling in the main cabin or the magnificent wooden grand staircase (as Alan Bates used to complain the Coast Guard didn't allow wooden window sashes in the NATCHEZ' pilothouse).
    As I've said before the devils in the details and the bill as written doesn't have many details.
    Food for thought.

    #2
    Not the case

    Jim, as you have been told several times before, this 10% reduction is nothing new. The Delta Queen has been undergoing structural fire-load reduction modifications since the 1990's, and you never noticed. All of the sundeck bathrooms and forward cabins, and some of the Texas Deck have been replaced with non combustible materials, with only the visible top surface being paneled in wood. This protects the authentic appearance, while meeting the USCG requirements in order to let the vessel sail. I think you'd be shocked how much of the Delta Queen is non-combustible already.

    Like you said, the devil is in the details, and thankfully those who now own the Delta Queen are deep into the details of it. In getting the exemption considered, there had to be some trade-offs. As with any bill, the details will be defined in the legislative language once its passed. It sure beats the alternative of letting the boat sit and rot somewhere because the only way to ensure she survives is to see her sail and generate some revenue.

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      #3
      Thank you, Phil, once again I opened my big mouth without knowing all the facts. I must say I assumed that "annual structural alterations to at least 10% of the area that are not constructed of fire retardant materials" meant all wood, down to the steel framework, had to be removed. Apparently, I was mistaken, thank you for enlightening me and others who assumed the same as me. Now lets get THE BILL out of committee and to the floor of both houses. I am quite optimistic that the it will pass in both houses.

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        #4
        How much is ACL paying their lobbyists to spread lies and kill the bill? We have to counteract that with massive letter/email writings!!

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          #5
          ACL

          I wondered the same thing and asked Cornel about it. Circumstances are different this year than in 2012-13 because of the entry of Viking into the market. Part of ACL's argument was to keep the partial monopoly which they've lost. It's highly doubtful they'd be willing to spend anything to keep a smaller boat like the Queen from running. It sure doesn't make economic sense to waste the funds.

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            #6
            While sitting on the porch swing this morning, coffee in hand I was looking at the latest Viking 2016 River Cruises-Vive la France! I read the description of the longships [built 2012-2016, length 443 ft., crew 50, passengers 190.....etc] then it got my attention "Sun Deck with shaded sitting area, organic herb garden, solar panels and walking track".

            So when the bill passes and the DQ gets refit for service she will-to keep up with 21st Century amenities-need a organic herb garden (not just old 20th century mint boxes) & solar panels!

            Current Sun Deck makes for a perfectly acceptable walking track I should think--from my mid (20th) Century mind.

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              #7
              Viking, whoopee, amenities

              I'm not a big herb fan, much rather have the mint for the juleps. As to solar panels, I sat in the sun all day storing up enough solar energy and sunburn to last the whole trip. Does the Viking walking track come with calliope encouragement?????
              The one thing that I would change on the DQ from my days is the bunk beds. I had difficulty getting up on the top one years ago and no way would I make it now. Making all those regular bunk bed rooms singles would not be cost effective - but it sure would be nice to have a few for singles without punishing us for having that status. Several rooms on the Texas 207,209 and the corresponding starboard ones for sure had the extra wide lower berth and a regular top bunk. I'd say that lower is comparable to today's twin xl. While it wouldn't be the most desirable size, that lower berth held two people OK (my parents) back in the day. Of course 338 etc. are a bit narrower rooms, but hey what is the difference between walking in a 24 inch area to the 'spacious' bathroom or walking in an 18 inch area? I realize this idea in no way fits the grandeur that today's boats publicize, but I don't think the DQ's reentry should try to make her 'just like everyone else'. She could be the GCG to the new DQ in 1949....

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                #8
                In their infinite lack of wisdom Majestic America Line added a wooden ledge behind the mattress to make those lower berths into standard twin size beds. It became a twin size lower with a standard upper berth. Hopefully, MAL's damage can and will be reversed! The extra wide lower and the built in storage spaces at the foot of the bed made those rooms quite comfortable.

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                  #9
                  Hey!

                  Hey Frank -you say that was a wooden board they put in? Remove those and there's a good part of the 10% modifications promised! :-)

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                    #10
                    Makes sense to me. So finally there will be some good that comes out of MAL's ownership of the DELTA QUEEN. It's about bloody time!

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                      #11
                      You're saying my favorite room (338) is narrower??? Gee, I never noticed. . . . .
                      :)
                      Just cause I'd have to step outside on the deck to change my mind. . . .
                      That's part of the charm of the DQ, yep, we're not the "usual customer" the other lines are looking for!
                      S'
                      David D.
                      PS and then there's that gol-darned noisy calliope very close at hand. . . .
                      Ah memories!

                      Comment


                        #12
                        338

                        5.5 x 13 plus the spacious bathroom - at least you can sit down on the throne and close the door, unlike the old 313/314!
                        One of the DQ's many charms is that rooms of the same category are not exactly the same. When I rode, I booked directly, as I knew the rooms like no travel agent ever could.

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                          #13
                          The Sun Deck upper/lower bed rooms never had the extra wide lower berths only the Texas Deck bunk bed rooms. So don't worry, David, 338 is still its same spacious size!

                          As far as quirky rooms, even 6 foot 4 inch me could not sit on the commode and touch the floor in room 210's WC. Also don't go looking for any more than one electric outlet in room 209, there just ain't any others! Until the bathrooms were enlarged in rooms 201 and 202 the door could not be shut while sitting in there, and to get to the shower one still has to step gingerly over the toilet.

                          What other "unique" rooms are there? Would others kindly share their memories here.

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                            #14
                            Well, yes you can shut the door if the bunk ladder isn't stored on it! :)
                            I always put the ladder on top of my bunk (the top one of course!). After a day or two on a trip, the cabin steward would figure it out and put it back up there instead of on the door--after all, during the day, I'm not using the bunk, so it's a great place to keep that thing out of the way!
                            Probably one of the reasons I never thought badly of the accommodations is that my family still runs a 1923 "Auto Court" (now a resort) whose cabins aren't much different than the DQ's cabins; although a bit larger. My Brother has put queen sized mattresses on the antique bed frames (some clever welding modifications to the frames) so the bedroom are even smaller nowadays. Some folks like them some hate them (check out the reviews online, Cave Springs, Dunsmuir, CA)--I notice many reviews call it a "1950s motel" Hmm, young people today have no good time-date reference points do they, some even call my '25 T a 1950s car!
                            But back on track. That "spacious bathroom" where you do have to pop the shower door open to raise your arms over your head! :) We've booked that room three times so far, oh wait, and once when she was in Chattanooga. The Desk wondered why we'd take that one when larger ones were available. TRADITION!!
                            Steamcerely,
                            David Dewey

                            Comment


                              #15
                              313, 314, in the old numbering

                              On my first trip in 1973 these were the public bathrooms. In 1974 they had been made into the then B category rooms. But they had the toilet which wouldn't allow for anyone, even a Carol Roth, to sit on the throne AND close the bathroom door at the same time. As you sat there facing the outer deck, you just hoped your roommate wouldn't open the cabin door just then. We veterans of the small rooms knew how to rearrange them for the most usuable space. Once Edie Schumaker and I were roomies in 314. The first thing we did was pull the life jackets out of the drawers under the bunk and stuff them behind the toilet. Instant storage space for our smaller items! I recall moving the wastebasket under the sink, repositioning the ladder from the side to the end, and of course using the bed as a ready-storage area for cameras, tape recorders, etc. They just got shoved aside the few hours we slept. My very first trip we had 130 and 131, the C bathroomless rooms just aft of the doorways - and right over the engine room. I never heard so many bells at night in my life, and of course then I didn't know what they meant. Next to no sleep that trip. We kidded that we had a 'suite' the Aft Cabin Lounge was our sitting room and the public bathroom/showers were only a few feet away from our sleeping rooms. There were 6 of these bathroomless rooms on the Cabin Deck, which were transformed into a larger room by combining with the next door room in 1984 or slightly before.

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