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    #16
    I loved those rooms on skid row after they were enlarged from bunk beds and toilets down the hall to having toilets en suite. If you could snag one on either side you had two windows looking over the side and one overlooking the stern. Also all of those rooms had their own window rattler air conditioning unit for the utmost in summer time comfort.

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      #17
      Upgraded Skid Row

      I had forgotten about the individual a/c units there. I never had a corner room, but a couple in the middle. I remember the noisy pop machine, and of course the traffic back there for one reason or another - one being to climb up and lean out of the portholes to catch the spray. And didn't they store linens or cleaning supplies in cabinets out there by the pop machine?

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        #18
        Reading about the "uniqueness" of various rooms such as not being able to be on the throne and close the bathroom door, feet not touching the floor while doing your business, bunk beds, etc. etc. leads to the question I must ask, even though I will probably get hate mail. Will the vacationing public in this day and time be willing to pay an average of $365.00 a day for those unique qualities?

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          #19
          Target group

          I would say definitely no to the ACLers, and probably not for most of the AQ pax. But no matter how much the DQ would be renovated, she is not going to match up to the newer boats. So she needs to stick to her true self and appeal to that niche group that likes the simpler pleasures, and there are people out there who would rather be watching the river than a Vegas style show, or who don't need more than the room facilities the DQ has. But the question is: how big is that group? Remember the Voyages to America slogan? How about Voyages to Yesterday or something similar...

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            #20
            If I have it, I'll pay it - but only for her. I'm not alone in preferring the simple pleasures and legitimate experience that the Delta Queen offers. Time will tell if there are enough of us.

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              #21
              I'd agree with "Voyages to Yesterday". I also always liked "Steam-Powered Time Machine". There are 3 reasons to go to your room on the DQ: sleep, change clothes, shower. Otherwise, you're enjoying the boat and the cruise. As Ginnie says, there are folks who will pay regardless, those who know what she is and realize what they're getting. It just has to be marketed rightly and truthfully. Make it seem like an exclusive club, which of course it is!

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                #22
                Speaking of marketing truthfully...

                Remember all those fisheye lens shots they used when showing a room? Made the 5.5 x 13 look much bigger. And all the models they used for the photo shoots... I always wondered where ordinary looking or less could vacation - I know I didn't see those models on my trips, except the 1979 one where they were doing the photo shoot for the '80 brochure (remember the Texas Deck furniture blowing across the bow in the strong winds and us few passengers waving our gloved hands out the door, Bob???)
                Back in my day the entertainment was the singalong, later a band set from 5-6 in the Texas, piano dinner music, and the band doing a brief show then dance music after dinner around 9:15 to whenever the band outnumbered the passengers, and of course the calliope music at the locks, landings and passing towns! No Vegas style shows/singers/dancers. Our Cruise Director organized the entertainment and was not a main performer, if at all. To my dying day I will remember my angst when some passengers went down to the Orleans Room at 10 AM to watch the old movie Steamboat Round the Bend, while we were cruising! They were ON a steamboat rounding bends, but didn't see that because they were watching an old movie inside. DUH.
                As to the pool of passengers today: RAGRBRAI just finished last weekend. Thousands of bike riders pedaled across the state of Iowa from the Missouri River to the Mississippi. They camped out each night in small towns along the way. Most say the best part of the experience is meeting the townsfolk and seeing rural America - this is certainly a group that could be targeted for the DQ. There ARE people who don't need, or want, bathrobes and Vegas shows on their boat trips. For those who do, there are plenty of options currently available. DELTA QUEEN, be the DELTA QUEEN, our anachronistic unique monarch of the rivers! Don't be 'just like'......

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                  #23
                  $365 a day?? If only it were that "cheap"! Yes, I think there are enough of us out there, especially if it is marketed honestly as a trip to yesteryear. The cabin, for us at least, was just a place to keep our "stuff" sleep, shower, bathroom needs, and quick camera battery refills! After all, there's the entire deck out there for a "sitting room" with the best decor one could ask for.
                  Yes, holding talks, etc. inside the Orleans room during daytime cruising time seemed counterproductive. Now if they were held on the front porch in front of the pilot house. . . . And, unfortunately all our trips were under MAL, so there was never enough calliope and other stuff going on! We went through many locks without calliope accompaniment, which was just WRONG! :)

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                    #24
                    *Earlier DQ rooms/Entertainment Etc.*
                    Greetings, Steamboating colleagues:
                    Catching up here reading the continuation of this most fascinating and informative thread. And to boot you ALL make great points, valid discussions with memories. From the very beginning in 1947, Capt. Tom Greene had a far different view of his then 'new' DELTA QUEEN than what appeared in later years under the Blake/Muster management. The original architectural plans drawn up in 1947 indicated the 'Skid Row' cabins be in time eliminated or combined. There were also other 'outside' cabins on the deck very small to miniscule with just the usual porcelain sink and the standard white porcelain chamber pot under the bed. It was no small hike out, down the deck and in to the back cabin to reach the even then limited lavatories and shower stalls. The then main bar/cocktail lounge was proposed for the starboard side directly behind the gift shop. That nixed early on, moved down below on the starboard side behind the main dining room later rechristened 'The Orleans Room.' due to limited space and concerns for passengers being bothered at night by bar noise. The original main dining room of both DK/DQ were aft of the Purser's Office and Gift Shop. We also have to remember that originally the DK and DQ built expressly for the 'night boat service runs' from San Francisco to Sacramento and not extensive long cruising. Passengers, at most, only aboard for one night--two if making the immediate return trip. Even in the 1920s and for a number of years creature comforts in cabins, full or even half baths a luxury. The GORDON C. GREENE had her own fans and followers in the river enthusiasts. Yet, the GCG was recognized for her shortcomings leading to Capt. Tom Greene purchasing the DQ. Mrs. Letha C. Greene mentions in detail the reasoning of her husband in her fine book 'Long Live the DELTA QUEEN.'

                    Betty Blake and colleagues found themselves in something of a sticky spot in later years where the 'image' of the DQ matched up with 'reality.' The company had brought in top travel writers, executives for a trip with all the whistles and bells. The real shock hit when several travel writers let go on their opinions. One went so far writing, "The DELTA QUEEN is nothing more than a preserved relic." Another hit home decrying that the "DELTA QUEEN is not a true Mississippi grand steamboat." I think you all get the idea with the above NOT being my own quotes or thinking. Judy is on the mark RE: "target market."

                    Betty Blake, when faced with the above quotes appearing in journals, quickly retrenched, regrouped with, "The DELTA QUEEN is one of a kind. Take her for what she is." Again, what do I know?

                    R. Dale Flick
                    Northern Shores of mighty Lake Michigan.

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                      #25
                      Volume of target group and 'repeaterism'

                      I honestly believe there is a market out there for the DQ restored, but not reinvented. But here is another question: how financially endowed is this group and how willing would they be to become frequent repeat passengers? I'm thinking most of us in this group aren't rolling in dough (unless its chocolate chip cookie dough), and while we'd support and ride as much as possible, I don't know how many trips that would be, and if it would fill the boat enough along with the single time passengers. This is not to say a wealthy person wouldn't appreciate the 'lesser things in life' for a week, but I'd suspect that number wouldn't be many and they would gravitate to the luxury boats. Another DQ draw that is going by the wayside is the cruising factor. A recent Viking European rivers commercial promotes "Spend less time getting there and more time being there." Now for a river town destination such as Cologne or Paris, yes time ashore is needed. But for Wabasha, LaCrosse, Davenport, Henderson, etc.? Half a day or less would suffice. Maybe the DQ slogan could be: Cruise, don't bus, your day away!!!

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                        #26
                        Repeat Passengers?

                        My wife and I made one cruise in 1995. We took the DQ for what she is/was and have many happy memories from that trip. I am not sure if we are repeat material - we have finite vacation dollars and an infinite bucket list.

                        I will state again briefly my plea for basing the boat in one port for a series of RT excursions, making it easy to plan airfare and other arrangements. The Kentucky Lake trips come to mind.

                        Wesley

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                          #27
                          In the landfill---or maybe more correctly---the dusty boxes is a rubber stamp I had made some eons ago reading---Discover America By Steamboat---coupled with other suggestions as seen on this thread the marketing could be targeted to seeing America by River, day and night.

                          There are people who ride very expensive bicycles on the C&O Canal Towpath from DC to Cumberland, MD, hike the Appalachian Trail in expensive hiking shoes. Look at the popularity of Steam Locomotive pulled fan trips. Both the Union Pacific Railroad and the Norfolk Southern Railway are in the process of restoring recently acquired (from parks or museums) Large Steam Locomotives.

                          The above said I hope as soon as the bill is signed and serious restoration is underway a wave of publicity can tap the folks who really want to see the real American from the inside out, i.e the River(s). Amen,

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                            #28
                            We've had a very nice, thoughtful discussion with a lot of good points and ideas. Here's my opinion...and we all know about opinions.....I have to ask myself the question "why would I?" Let me start by saying that unless they install an elevator there is no way we would be able to take a trip on Her Royal Highness. My wife can't walk up and down three flights of stairs three or four times a day to get to the dining room. And we are members of the "prime" cruise market..retired with the resources and time to be able to cruise.
                            It's kind of like cars, a 1962 VW bug was a blast to drive and a lot of fun, but why would I want to drive one today when, for the same money, I could have a Camry. After all both cars are on the same highway, going to the same places. A trip in one would be an "adventure" and in the other comfort. There are still plenty of people who crave the adventure, but you see a lot more Camrys on the highway than you do Bugs.
                            But, what do I know?

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                              #29
                              And I'm on the other end of the teeter totter!

                              While I couldn't afford the number of trips I took on the DQ, I could afford one a year on the AQ, but I don't want to book her. One trip was enough to experience it. But I don't want a bathrobe, etc. I want to be on a boat that is moving, not sitting 12 beautiful hours at a landing. Now while I didn't go to any shows nor dine in the JM White, that's fine for those who like and want that. BUT I had to pay for it, whether I used it or not. Suffice it to say if I figured out the cost of the facilities, services I used, it would be far less than what I paid. So, no paddle wheel and diesel powered, but it's now the TWILIGHT for me, which provides a real RIVER trip without all the accoutrements of a Vegas hotel. And that is strictly my opinion and preference.

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                                #30
                                I'm with Judy on this, once was enough to say I've ridden the AQ.

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