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    What's the DQ's status?

    It's been a while since there has been any news. Does the boat still have to move at the end of the month and if so where are they going to move her? Is she still open as a hotel? How did she fair over this cold winter? Is she still owned by the same people?

    #2
    The only question that I can answer is about the lease. Last September the "Chattanooga Times Free Press" reported that Zanterra signed a new six month lease with the city, so the Old Gal still has a month left on that. Hopefully, Zanterra will be loathe to sign another lease and divest themselves of her soon to people that want to see her run again.

    Comment


      #3
      Yesterday's Chattanooga Times Free Press Chattanooga News | Times Free Press had an article about the Old Gal, and it says this past winter has been tough on her. The boat has been closed for a month and a future reopening appears doubtful.

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        #4
        This is not very acurate. We all know how much we ca trust the news.

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          #5
          I have said for a long time in regards to the press , if they get as much wrong with what we know something about what about what we know nothing about. With that being said, what's wrong with the article?

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            #6
            It must have been a slow news day on Monday when this first came out, as the media has greatly exaggerated the severity. The damage isn't nearly as bad as implied, and is being corrected by someone with many years experience on the Delta Queen. As with anything as old and special as the DQ, extra care is being taken to isolate all of the leaks and carefully remove any paneling and woodwork necessary to make the repairs so that it can be put back without any indications there were ever a problem. The boat isn't filling up with water as one article pointed out. As soon as the leaks were discovered the water was shut off to the boat. She has always sat deeper in the stern since her arrival in Chattanooga, primarily due tot he lack of fuel in her forward tanks and minimal ballast in the bow, this is nothing new.

            I commend the Ingrams for their quick response to the unfortunately inevitable problem. They called on some of the boats former crew and have immediately put them to work making repairs the right way, with experienced people. This is the reason the DQ always wintered in NOLA, shes just not meant for sub-zero temperatures.

            Comment


              #7
              She was originally built for the Sacramento Delta, where sub-freezing temperatures are short, if there are any!
              Also, If I'm not mistaken; in Layup her non-essential water systems were usually drained.

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                #8
                DQ didn't always layup in NOLA

                A couple of people have mentioned that the DQ always laid up in New Orleans. That is not true. When she was based in Cincinnati, she wintered there, but as David pointed out, the water was drained out to prevent problems. Once the DQ Company moved its headquarters to NOLA, she and the MQ and later the AQ wintered there. The DQ's first trip of the season under the Greenes was the Cincy to NOLA roundtrip Mardi Gras cruise.

                Comment


                  #9
                  *DQ 'insulation'/Good comments above*
                  Steamboating colleagues:
                  Just back from our deep blue water cruise at sea and catching up here reading all as fast as I can. No comments from me on the article RE: the DQ and this winter as...well...I'm certainly no expert or on the scene. In journalism it is noted that there can be an 'error' of from 4% to 10% in reportage. Again, I don't know and haven't sense enough to comment on it.

                  David Dewey is right on RE: the DELTA QUEEN originally built for the Sacramento run with somewhat milder temps there. Sacramento, often called "Indianapolis, Indiana with palm trees," did experience frost and some cold at times but no snow I know of unless David can correct me. John Burns, son of the DQ/DK builder Jim Burns, related here in my home that the two boats were never trully insulated as they would have been here on our Inland Rivers. "Insulation was minimal if all all," his notes read here. Insulation then often was either cork or now forbidden asbestos of the era. John Burns also recalled "...frost on the decks in Sacramento with men falling down...care in loading autos for shipment." In the boiling heat of summer while in Sacramento, both the DQ/DK crews would stretch/hang vast while canvas awnings over the upper decks of the two boats for shade and to cool down the boats somewhat before the night runs back to San Francisco. There are a few rare photos of these shade awnings to be seen in some photo collections and books. Our own period U.S. Navy did the same on ships of war in hot climates. These DQ/DK canvas awnings were secured to rails with lanyards or eyelets in brass mountings with hooks hauled up, taken down by the "sailormen" as crews were often called then even on river steamboats. John Burns and Jim never used the term "steamboat" in California always terming them "ships" as was the custom.

                  Judy correct on the boat based here with the GREENE LINE all those years. Many a Mardi Gras trip I saw her leave here in bitter cold headed for the 'sunny south.' Winter of 1962/'63 dad and I visited the DQ laid up here with ice nearly from shore to shore, temps near -0- with a low scraping, rumbling along the outside hull. Cal Benefeld and Ralph Horton would fire her up raising the heat in the boat's public rooms until you nearly fainted. Capt. Doc Hawley remembered days when starboard pipes near the gift shop, starboard side and the Purser Office port side would freeze up with, again, panels taken down for repairs. And her glass cabin windows were never the present high tech double-paned units we know today. They would open cabin doors etc. to get as much warm air flow circulating as possible and let her rip. The winter residual crew would sweep--not shovel--snow from her decks. It was constant monitoring by walking around, checking all. This nothing new with many boats/ships in cold weather regions even now. Nothing as miserable as a boat/ship laid up in the dead of winter. Capt. Fred Way wrote/recalled his own steamboating career with boats compared to "chicken coops on a raft...boiling hot in the summer; freezing cold in the winter." Well, again, what do I know?

                  R. Dale Flick
                  Coal Haven Landing, Ohio River, Cincinnati

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Yes she did winter in Cincinnati while under GL, but she also didn't have the same sprinkler system throughout the entire superstructure back then, and from what I have been told they usually kept minimal steam in the boat and freezing was still sometimes a problem as Dale mentioned.

                    The current sprinkler system is very difficult to drain, and if drained would disable it. Not something we would want if the boat was open as a hotel with the public onboard.

                    It's unfortunate, but part of life on a boat in cold weather. The good news is, the repairs are going well and she should be back in ship shape before long.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      *DQ in winter/Phillip's comments*
                      Hi, Phillip:
                      Thanks for your informative report on the boat. Another quaint memory I have of the old GREENE LINE whafboat and offices here came to mind. For years they heated the company offices with a very big 'gravity' coal furnace under the office spaces. 'Gravity' coal furnaces didn't have a blower like units today depending on cold air drops to the fire box...cold air down; warm air up. The chimney on the roof in cold weather gave off good old coal smoke with that pungent fragrance few today experienced or remember. There was the night watchman then who, no doubt, kept the coal furnace banked at night, fired up in the morning. The wharfboat did have window air-conditioners hooked up for the warm season. Water for office needs, lavatories came over from a big hose hooked up on the cobble stoned landing along with phone lines. On the lower level JOHNSON PARTY BOATS had also an office. And no doubt then the GL office lavatories possibly just dumped direct into the river below. Jim Reising, Don Sanders, Kenny Howe and others may recall this. Funny the things you remember with one .org posting sparking my dismal brain. That was a LONG time ago with those days 'gone forever.' Again, what do I know?

                      R. Dale Flick
                      Coal Haven Landing, Ohio River, Cincinnati

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Snow in the Sacramento Delta happens occasionally--like once a Decade. Overnight frost also occurs, but usually above freezing temperatures during the day. Yes, slippery decks during the overnight trips (Remember, the DQ & DK were built as overnight boats.). The "cold period" for the Delta is usually end of November to first of February--the Almond trees usually are in bloom by the second week of February--they were much earlier this year. Of course, the minute they bloom we get: frost, or rain, or wind to ruin the crop! Also, there is the "fog season" usually end of December to first of March--and it can be bitter cold (even if it's 50 degrees--it just goes clear to the bone--I would rather be in snow at 17 degrees!). It's also thick as pea-soup, which is why the boats had compasses--and the bends in the river had "echo boards" to bonce the whistle signals back to the pilot. Navigating the Delta was very different from the Inland waterways! But I digress.
                        The sprinkler system would, I would suspect, be of larger diameter pipe to facilitate water flow, so it would freeze last. If one opens the end drain/flush valve and provides some water circulation through the system, freezing is USUALLY avoided. Also you wouldn't want it disabled at any time, for the boat's protection (Just IMHO, "but what do I know" to quote a well-known poster here (heh heh heh!). The preceding water knowledge is from decades of maintaining a 1923 era vacation resort with similarly "insulated" cabins (read: "Insulation?? We don' need no stinkin' Insulation!")
                        Good to hear that repairs are going well.
                        Steamcerely,
                        David Dewey
                        Where the sun is shinning and it's almost 70 degrees--but scared to death about forest fires!

                        Comment


                          #13
                          *Sacramento weather/River there*
                          Hi, David & steamboating colleagues:
                          Thanks, David, for your very informative posting on the climate/regime of the Sacramento River direct from one who knows. I'd read/heard about what is termed the "California semi-winter' there along with the cold and fog. Your mention of "echo boards" along with use of compases for navigating on the money. Both DQ/DK were equipped with one or more compases from the time they entered service down to final years under U.S. Navy service. There was at one time a scheme/plan to have boats out there navigate San Franciso Bay and the Sacremento River using not only visual and compas bearings but a kind of device with a paper roll advancing to help in navigation. Old Jim Burns had these installed on the DQ/DK for a time along with a registration device in their pilot houses with a kind of paper disc and ink needle to record each and ever roll and 'blip' of the paddlewheels on the two boats. These Jim saved, studied to determine efficiency in the boats' operations. Jim Burns was always working to study factors in increasing steam engine efficiency, fule consumption going way back to his days in Alaska during the 1898 gold rush when he worked on steamboat engines on the Yukon River. A number of steamboat operators in the U.S. heard/knew of Jim's efficiency studies writing him for ideas and suggestions over the years.

                          There were more than a few magnetic compasses on the boats in their years made by a company based in San Francisco. The very last compass was removed from the DELTA QUEEN by Capt. Tom Greene and given to a friend of his. It served on this man's private boat in Florida later coming into the river collection of Charlie Brown [Builder of the little steamboat LORENA] here in Cincinnati. When Charlie passed away his widow, Lorena Brown, had me inventory all of his collection with the compass mounted in a teakwood swivel frame and other materials going to S&D and the Ohio River Museum in Marietta. Keith and Judy recall seeing some of these items in my car. This "compass, compass, who's got the compass?" question has come up again and again. In those early days the DQ/DK compasses were mounted 'binnacle style' on the boats in the pilothouses.

                          We've also discussed on this site in the past the history of several steam whistles being changed/mounted on the DQ for a time by Capt. Tom Greene. I think Jim Reising and others know more about this as did our late Alan Bates. I do recall vaguely hearing different DQ whistles ages and ages ago here but can't recall now their sounds. I 'think' the whistle from the SPRAGUE was even considered at one time. Keith, Jim and Kenny could possibly enlighten us more on this as could Capt Bill Judd. HELP! Seems there was some problem with matching up the steam pipe dimensions of the SPRAGUE whistle to exiting piping on the DQ. Right now I'm drawing a blank on this. Well, what do I know?

                          R. Dale Flick
                          Coal Haven Landing, Ohio River, Cincinnati.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Wow,
                            We are getting "far afoot" from the original posting here, but I have to say this;
                            As a Curator, I am amazed at how pieces of the Queen were (are?) removed to be given away as mementos, or honorariums. I realize that she is just "a tool of commerce", but sheesh Louise! She's a National Treasure! One of these removals that really amazed me was one of the whistles from the Calliope (although the Calliope is not original to the Queen); because a replacement had to be crafted so the Calliope could continue to be used (well, I suppose it could be argued that one doesn't "need" the bottom note??).
                            I know on the last public trip, there was talk of "liberating" souvenirs; but I think most everyone, like myself, had too much respect for her to do anything like that!
                            OK, got that off my chest, I feel better now! Back to 'normal' programming!!
                            S'
                            David D.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              What?

                              What pieces have been removed for souvenirs, David?

                              Comment

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