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How Would You Do It ??????? (2)

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  • Tom Schiffer
    replied
    MeL: If I can get this done, here is a photo of the deckhands on the BELLE OF LOUISVILLE doing their thing. It was taken on October 11, 2009. That is Pete O., alternate Master on the wing bridge. Cap'n Walnut
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  • Shipyard Sam
    replied
    Dreamboats

    Hate to be a wet blanket, but there's no one, with money, chomping at the bit to throw their wad into an overnight venture whether it be steam or diesel, old or new, paddlewheel or screw. It's dreamers like us, without a spare nickel, who have these grandiose pipe dreams about the next grand dreamboat.

    No one loves hot, water vapor more than I, but diesels make things a lot less complicated and less costly to build and operate, althought I dream along with Cap'n Ted and believe that Steam is the only way to go.

    The CASINO ROCK ISLAND is for sale, just about the right size, and about one of the prettiest sleep-aboard boats ever built.

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  • Pete Sisak
    replied
    I digress, so Mea Culpa for stating this...the beer machine reminds me of traversing Stark's in PDC with a certain entertainer who will remain nameless with a liquor list for various members of the crew! I was just 16 & used my parents' Pontiac to drive up there as they had dropped me off to ride the DQ up to St Paul so I could drive Grandpa Zahn back to Door County!
    Yes, in those days, I was 16 and could freely enter a liquor store in WI...but that's another story!

    As seeing as I was a passenger, I could carry on "anything", as I helped that entertainer in question deliver those parcels into the crews quarters...and that same entertainer had also briefed me..."what you see in the crew quarters, stays in the crew quarters!!!"

    25 years later, it makes for a funny memory! Needless to say that 16 year old Pete made a few friends that cruise for delivering the hooch!

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  • Judy Patsch
    replied
    Crew arrivals

    Yes, Lexie, the crew arrivals after a shore stop were often interesting - all you have to do to get one famous crew member red in the face is say: "Kentucky Lake"! Unfortunately there were occasionally passengers arriving late, not inebriated, but usually loaded with souvenirs from town, and who acted like they were royalty because the boat had waited for them. On my one and only Caribbean cruise, a couple arrived back at our ship after the lines had been let go and we were perhaps 10 ft. off the dock in Cozumel. They had to hire a water taxi/pilot boat to bring them to the ship - our Captain was a German and was no nonsense. I wish we would have had another shore stop because I would have loved to see when that couple would have returned that time!

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  • Lexie Palmore
    replied
    And, if you hit the beer machine just right, the beer was free. Yes, there was some abuse of this priviledge, but too much abuse and you were gone. I thought the prohibition was uncalled for, but that was the tip of the iceburg on what suddenly was prohibited. Another entertaining aspect of the old days was that you had to be on board by departure time, not an hour before departure. This caused a lot of last minute scurrying to get on board, especially if the "Last of the Mohicans" were a little enebriated, which they usually were. Capt. Wagner liked to raise the stage a little before departure, and, for some, it was a little too much, causing some last minute arrivals to have to struggle. Highly entertaining. So that's how I would do departure.

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  • inactive user 02
    replied
    Just had a thought.....

    Did anyone think of how perfect the M/V GENERAL JACKSON of Opryland would be as a conversion to overnight? She has a drivetrain that is very mega efficient....she IS a paddlewheeler....she has the LOOK of an oldtime boat down pat! She was built with a steam boiler for the whistle and calliope (although neither work, you could get one back onboard).

    There you have it, looks, modern efficiency, ambiance...what more do we need?

    Think of it, her show room would convert to the insides of a overnight boat so easy...its hollow!

    Wonder who would have the money to buy her plans and recreate her? Or, perhaps who would buy her lock, stock, and barrel from Gaylord Entertainment (her owners) and convert her?

    Any ideas?

    Travis

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  • Judy Patsch
    replied
    Crew beer machine

    Originally posted by mel hartsough View Post
    Oh that was on the MQ actually. I think the DQ had one machine in their Crew Mess. And of course Prohibition started in 79 about the time I became a mate and the officers could still posess and consume alcohol so I just did miss that one.
    I recall one trip where some passengers found out about the crew machine and had the gall to go down there for their beer... if you could afford to ride the boat, you could afford the Texas Bar price. I don't know what beer was, but my Planter's Punch was $2.88, including tip!

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  • mel hartsough
    replied
    Oh that was on the MQ actually. I think the DQ had one machine in their Crew Mess. And of course Prohibition started in 79 about the time I became a mate and the officers could still posess and consume alcohol so I just did miss that one.

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  • mel hartsough
    replied
    Yep Tom 35 cents a can, Bud, Michelob, and Natural lite. Coke started that when they bought the company in 77. They had 2 Coke machines in the crew Mess and one up in the Promenade Deck Crew Lounge. And when I became a Mate I remember being criticized for eating in the crew mess with my guys rather than in the Officers Mess.

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  • Ted Davisson
    replied
    Tom , Point Well Taken !!

    Tom ,
    Point well taken and just imagine the mamoth overhead and expenses that could be saved by having the office on the boat ! Also , like you mentioned just imagine the learning experiences that could be shared by both the office and boat people as far as how to successfully and properly run a steamboat company !!
    Smooth Sailing !
    Ted



    Originally posted by Tom Schiffer View Post
    Ted: Life on the boat by owners/front office people is certainly nothing new. However, I cannot imagine any crew that would welcome it! Just as the owners would learn about running a boat, so the crew would learn about real problems faced by the front office. It is not that you can't teach old dogs new tricks, it is more in the vein that we are comfortable with what we do and DON'T WANT TO learn new tricks! Cap'n Walnut

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  • Tom Schiffer
    replied
    Ted: Life on the boat by owners/front office people is certainly nothing new. However, I cannot imagine any crew that would welcome it! Just as the owners would learn about running a boat, so the crew would learn about real problems faced by the front office. It is not that you can't teach old dogs new tricks, it is more in the vein that we are comfortable with what we do and DON'T WANT TO learn new tricks! Cap'n Walnut

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  • Ted Davisson
    replied
    Tom , excellent idea !!

    Tom ,
    Excellant idea ! Wow , what a novel idea to run the company and the boat from the boat ! I like it but not sure how some VIP , CEO would cater to working and living with the " working class " !! Great idea though ! Keep them coming !!
    Smooth Sailing !
    Ted Davisson



    Originally posted by Tom Schiffer View Post
    How about puttin' the small office staff right on the boat? Like Alan sez, cycle them thru the boat staff. That way they will get to KNOW the problems of actually running the boat and in the case of crew...running the front office. It is interesting for me to note that I cannot detect one front-office person posting on this board. I din't say there were none, just that they keep a low profile if they are here! As a book author, I know that promotion is not important, it is EVERYTHING. When you consider that most prospective pax hardly ever even SEE a steamboat, you begin to see the magnitude of the job. If recent past operations are any indication there was a concerted effort to keep them off the boat. (anybody on this board besides me been denied entry?) I know, that shore folks get in the way of "turning the boat around", but, what better way than to expose them to satisfied folks who are just coming off a cruise? The crew won't like it, but I note they don't like not having a job either. Like sandbars, drift, high and low water and fog, prospective passengers must be dealt with somewhere, somehow...what more effective place than on the boat itself? What about having the Captain's Dinner (gasp!) uptown? Pre advertised that it is open to all (Dutch treat) and have the crew there in full uniform?? I might add that one of Betty Blake's very real assets (that I never see mentioned) was the fact that she was not at all hard to look at and was very visible EVERYWHERE. As far as paddle wheels are concerned, I like 'em, but I note that my two little steamers attract plenty of attention and neither one has a paddle wheel...but they ARE steam-powered and I'm not afraid to use the whistle! Visibility is one thing, but liking what they see is quite another! Now, this is just one guy's opinion. Cap'n Walnut.

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  • Tom Schiffer
    replied
    Mel: I would not mind at all being invited to the "deckhand's table" in the dining room...beer at 35 cents a can, you say!?? How 'bout that, Bruno?? Knock the bar-bill back a bit methinks! What did it cost up there in the Texas Lounge? I'd say, Mel, that the deckhands on the BELLE OF LOUISVILLE still put on a fine show! For the most part they do not hafta figure out a new or different landing every time but they have it honed down pretty fine for those of us who care to watch. This is something to add to the list of things we would do if...Cap'n Walnut

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  • mel hartsough
    replied
    I applaud you Skipper! When I was a young deckhand without a care in the world landing the boat was an art and the majority of the guys I worked with gave it their all when it came to landings. With 300 or so pax out there watching and the Cap'n hollerin orders and directions over the loudspeakers and the Mate working the bow and the capstan it was quite a performance. When I rode the DQ in August 97 with several other ex steamboaters it was a bit of a letdown as everything was done over portable radios and the Deck crew pretty much walked the lines up to the deadmen with little or no enthusiasm. Its kinda like what Judy was talking about the old down home feeling of steamboatin being gone. Yep decking sure wasnt for the money but it was definitely an adventure.

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  • Tom Schiffer
    replied
    Mel: Mebbe I'm a minority, but I admire and respect deckhands. For openers, they are a lot more fun to watch at a landing than the pilot on the wing bridge or the engineer with his oil can...not that these two are not important. But the ballet put on by some seasoned deckhands is a pure delight to me and I'm sure that it is to all the officers on board who know that a lot of the safety of the boat is also in their hands at locks and landings especially. Cap'n Walnut

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