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The Radar's Point Of View

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    #16
    Mary: I can certainly appreciate your glee at having blown that big Lunkenheimer, but, perhaps, a distant second to it is to salute the QUEEN from my little steam launch and to have her return it in kind...with her officers scurrying out on the wing bridge to take pictures of little MISSIE. I'd love to see one of their pictures! And, BOY, have we ever run off with Cap'n Ted's thread! Cap'n Walnut.

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      #17
      I'll say. Makes me waana not spend so much time posting on a subject.

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        #18
        Arrr matey, a hijackin' we will goe!!
        A Happy Thanksgiving to all too!
        :)
        David

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          #19
          On the other hand cap'n, this is the most posting that has happened on the forum for a while, so that might make up for the piratery! And your subject IS most interesting to many of us. Since we are going into winter, maybe you can post some examples of weather showing up on the screen?
          S'
          David D.

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            #20
            Also, they do a bang up job of picking up swarms of low flying May flies on the Upper. Not that one could do anything about it. Are you guys really taking pictures of your radar?

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              #21
              Kind of like computers. You're afraid to turn it off as it may not turn on again. However, back in the olden days, we didn't run the DQ radar in daylight, unless there was fog. Towboats routinely run them all the time as it gives a clear picture of the location of the tow and its relationship to the river. I really doubt that they use that much energy, though.

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                #22
                Nobody has mentioned that to find today's postage-stamp-sized navigation light targets in daytime a pilot absolutely needs a radar. They are cleverly painted green to match the summer foliage and red to blend with the forest in the fall.
                When pilots were expected to see them they were marked by big white "X"es or were billboard-sized diamonds. Eliminating all of that white-painted wood saved the USCG lighthouse service upwards of twelve dollars a year, maybe more. ;-)

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                  #23
                  I remember back in the early 80's when I was a mate and got to steer, unoffically of course, all my time was at night due to the fact that the company had no interest in creating any pilots from within at that time. There were pilots such as Capt. Palmore that let me steer and mentored me and then there were pilots that just had enough faith in me above Baton Rouge that they would let me steer so they could nap all night as they had been up all day and evening. Of course I relied heavily on the Radar and remember thinking of how much it was like a video game with 500+ lives in my hands. I have to say I enjoyed that about as much as anything I have ever done. And I would like to say thank you to Capt. Lexie Palmore as she was the only one that ever let me steer down through the "Battle Zone",under her watchful eye of course, between NOLA and BR where the real "work" is.

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                    #24
                    As I recall, the crossing dayboards were pretty large, but the passing boards were just in the 'why bother' category. For pilots who cover the same territory time after time, they are little more than a gentle hint. I found binoculars to be one of the greatest aids to navigation. I came along a little too late for the big white X's. When did they cease to exist? As a sign painter, I know that a sign that looks really big up close can shrink to nothing out on a highway, or river. If you are unfamiliar with a stretch of river, you would like dayboards the size of a Walmart, and lights the size of an airport beacon. At which point in time you wouldn't need a radar.

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