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  • Lexie Palmore
    replied
    How come covering them doesn't snuff them out or at least cause a lot of soot buildup or a fire? We used kerosene lanterns on the Ghost if we were out after dark. One nice and rather strange thing about them is that they do not attract insects. We used them in the interest of historic authenticity, and they do create a nice warm glow. And that tiny little tank of fuel will keep them going for hours and hours.

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  • Bob Reynolds
    replied
    Jim, since I was banned from participated, I didn't jump in, but I would have been wrong anyway...I would have gone with the fleet light answer!

    In the asphalt trade, we put our lines in the void tanks of the barge. They stay dry and toasty and if they do get wet during use, given enough time, may dry out between locks.

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  • Jim Reising
    replied
    Ted...you're the big winner. Next time you're up this way or if I ever make it to NOLA again, I'll present you a big Snickers Bar.
    Yes, when I asked the captain why he needed kerosene lanterns he said, "they're for my lock lines". For those who don't know, lock lines on a tow are heavy 2" diameter ropes usually 60 ft. long and they weigh a lot; much too heavy to carry back to the boat after each use so they are coiled down and left on the head of the tow. In the winter freezing spray makes the lines useless. The solution to this problem is to place a lantern in the middle of the coiled down line and cover the whole thing with a tarp. The lantern keeps the line warm and unfrozen.
    What an old fashioned solution to an ageless problem even with all our 21st century technology there has yet to be invented a better method.

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  • R. Dale Flick
    replied
    *RE: Kerosene lanterns.*
    Jim, if late October did it have to do with Halloween? Somebody playing a joke using lantern lights? Setting up some kind of light design? Heck, I don't know.

    R. Dale Flick
    Coal Haven landing, Ohio River.

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  • Ted Davisson
    replied
    Jim , was it to keep the .......................................

    Jim , was it to keep the deck lines from freezeing ?



    Originally posted by Jim Reising View Post
    Several years ago when I was dispatching for ACBL before the days of computers, we used to get traffic from the boats via short wave radio several times each day. One day a captain requested, "Jim, have the warehouse set out a couple of kerosene lanterns and 5 gals of kerosene for me". I got to wondering why a modern towboat would need kerosene lanterns since they have electricty out on the head of the tow and the deck crews have flashlights. Here's the question....why do towboats still need kerosene lanterns? A gaint Snickers bar to the winner.
    Bob Reynolds and all other boat pilots are excused from this contest.

    Leave a comment:


  • David Dewey
    replied
    Jim,
    I know that batteries reduce their output in cold weather, and being out in rain isn't good for many electric stuff either. The warmth from the flame also keeps the lense clear under certain weather conditions.
    S'
    David D.

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  • Ted Davisson
    replied
    To Keep.............................................. ................

    Jim , could it have been to keep the coils of line from freezeing at night ?? When I tow boated for Rose Barge Line on the Illinois River , we would do just that to keep our deck lines limber and unfrozen and covered in heavy duty bags or canvase Hope you don't mind me answering .
    Smooth Sailing !
    Ted Davisson



    Originally posted by Jim Reising View Post
    I'll give you a couple of hints....It was late October en the captain requested the lanterns and it had nothing to do with fleetlights.

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  • Jim Reising
    replied
    I'll give you a couple of hints....It was late October en the captain requested the lanterns and it had nothing to do with fleetlights.

    Leave a comment:


  • Frank X. Prudent
    replied
    I've seen some fleeted barges with kerosene lanterns out on their heads at night. Maybe no one wants to steal an old kerosene lantern, but a battery powered one would be gone by dawn's break.

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  • R. Dale Flick
    replied
    *RE: Kerosene lanterns in 2009.*
    Hi, Jim & steamboating colleagues:
    Interesting SNICKERS BAR question from Jim and I don't know the REAL answer as I never worked on the river. Yet, for years around Cincinnati I've noted kerosene lanterns with clear, red, green, amber glass on barge heads and on docked vessels/barges along with electric. I have three such lanterns out in my garage I cleaned and filled with kerosene this spring to try out and they look great at night on the patio or deck tables--lots of antique atmosphere. The kerosene reservoir is filled with a kind of cotton batting to absorb the oil.

    I'd opine in igornance: 1. Kerosene lanterns easily moved around in place avoiding electric wires to trip over. 2. Battery lanterns too fussy to mess with. 3. Docked vessels not linked to a tow for electric power or from shore easier to mark with kerosene lanterns. Or, just a preference from years of use. I just ran to look and two of my lanterns were for 'Marine Use,' other one from the N&W Railroad. I'll look again for the manufacturer's mark in time. These probably nearly 100 years old [?].

    Well, what do I know?
    R. Dale Flick
    Coal Haven Landing, Ohio River where you still see kerosene lanterns.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jim Reising
    started a topic Another Giant Snickers Prize

    Another Giant Snickers Prize

    Several years ago when I was dispatching for ACBL before the days of computers, we used to get traffic from the boats via short wave radio several times each day. One day a captain requested, "Jim, have the warehouse set out a couple of kerosene lanterns and 5 gals of kerosene for me". I got to wondering why a modern towboat would need kerosene lanterns since they have electricty out on the head of the tow and the deck crews have flashlights. Here's the question....why do towboats still need kerosene lanterns? A gaint Snickers bar to the winner.
    Bob Reynolds and all other boat pilots are excused from this contest.
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