Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

A New Program?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    A New Program?

    It has now been several weeks, only seems longer, since the last of the D. Q. crew was sent away from the boat. The A. Q. crew not far behind. I'm willing to bet that a number of us are aimlessly wandering around trying to figure out our steamboatless future.
    Part of the problem is that long term employment on the steamboats make other employment very unsatisfactory. Steamboaters also tend to be an independant natured person. Not a condition favorable to shoreside employers.
    I know that race horses and grayhounds are often adopted after their careers are over. Maybe someone or goverment agency could start an An Adopt A Stammboater program. I think the old Hanson's Hospital in Carville is vacant, you would need some place with at least a river view. This could be the housing and process center to set up the program.
    News paper inserts, fliers, and computer could have pictures and information about the steamboaters up for adoption. Most would be single adoptions but I know of several deckhands that would have to be adopted in pairs as one of the two is unmanagable without the other one.
    Care for a Steamboater should not be that difficult when one looks at the living conditions they were subject to when on the boat. Needless to say, as the adoptions happen they would have to be allowed to stay in touch with one another. Maybe even taken to a riverside park and allow to mingle with there own kind.
    Wouldn't you like to be the first one at the next MOR S+D meeting to say you have your very own steamboater?
    One would of course have to have their own steam whistle to be able to call them back home when they roam too far. A sign at the end of the walkway would let them know when you expect them to be back on board your home.
    While there are many details to be worked out, I hope the readers of this board will offer their ideas and maybe pick up the idea and get the handi line thrown so we can start getting this program tied off.
    I realize there are other things that can be done. Thus far my standing along side the road with "Will work for Steamboatin'" has had mixed results and two arrests. While it was food and a place to sleep. I feel myself and those others who have served faithfully on steamboats deserve better.
    Yes I also can be adopted.

    #2
    Fred,

    I will be the first to let myself be put up for adoption!

    This one comes with an extensive knowledge of river history, relatively low land miles (high river miles), the ability to play the calliope and piano, semi-artistic...conversationally adept, and house broken.

    Looking for a good home!

    Adopt your steamboater now, we are the perfect gift for the holidays...and much more personal than "the Clapper"!

    ~Travis~

    Comment


      #3
      I agree it's a great idea--would have to be handled carefully. I'm thinking, for instance, that the match-ups between steamboaters and people adopting them would have to be carefully considered. Travis and I would need to be matched with folks who can stand to be talked at all day. Adopting someone like one of our musicians would mean you would need to be able to tolerate music at unpredictable times. If you adopt an oiler, be prepared to have your hinges oiled hourly, your gauges read at regular levels, and your chain yanked on a regular basis.

      Comment


        #4
        Dream On...

        Sounds sad. If you had a license you could move smartly into a job aboard a gamlin' boat. Though they don't go far, they pay well-enough with benefits, and the view is terriffic... if you're in the Pilothouse.

        There's three genuine steamboatmen on my boat; also a Mississippi River Pilot's pilot, and other excellent boat men and women in the pilothouse. One pending Bridge Mate position may be filled soon, otherwise we'll continue looking. Though all the Deckhand and Oiler slots are full, we have an immediate opening for a Chief Engineering, and a housekeeping job, or two, may not be filled at this moment.

        Good Luck. Isn't it fun to dream?

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by Shipyard Sam View Post
          Sounds sad. If you had a license you could move smartly into a job aboard a gamlin' boat. Though they don't go far, they pay well-enough with benefits, and the view is terriffic... if you're in the Pilothouse.

          There's three genuine steamboatmen on my boat; also a Mississippi River Pilot's pilot, and other excellent boat men and women in the pilothouse. One pending Bridge Mate position may be filled soon, otherwise we'll continue looking. Though all the Deckhand and Oiler slots are full, we have an immediate opening for a Chief Engineering, and a housekeeping job, or two, may not be filled at this moment.

          Good Luck. Isn't it fun to dream?
          What? No banjo player?

          paul

          Comment


            #6
            Adoption

            Available for immediate adoption. Banjo/guitarist with vocals.

            Will gladly live in a 6' x 6' steel box under water, do my own laundry, eat just about whatever is put in front of me, and will insist on telling silly stories and demand that you participate in a sing-a-long three afternoons a week at 4:30

            Contact the Bob Stevens Home for wayward banjo players at 1-800-TUNETHATTHING.

            Paul

            Comment


              #7
              I read this to Linda and her immediate response was, "I already have one!"
              Hmmm, While I've never "worked" on the boats, I am very independent, Think I'd rather be on the boat than most other places (well, a steam-powered railroad might be close), and I can watch the rivers and still be amazed at the changes. Oh, and I tell silly, punny stories all the time too. Still don't think that makes me a real one though.
              S'
              David D.

              Comment


                #8
                Ok, I talked it over with Deb, and we think this is a great idea...You guys are housebroken, right? No outstanding warrants?

                Not too sure about our locale. Not too much brown water around, there is a 3 foot seasonal stream that runs through the front of the property. However, there could be side trips to the Genesee River, New York State Barge Canal and the St Lawrence Seaway if anybody starts getting the shakes. And even longer side trips to blue water lakes (barely any current at all unfortunately), though a passport will be required. A visit to the lake does involve various boats, though....*sigh*, propulsion is of the despised two stroke "Mercury" system (engines horizontal 3 by 2.5's) on all boats, we'll try to improve on that. Lots of wildlife at this location and at the lake location, most of it non-threating. At the lake location we even have Mayflies!

                I do have some good news for any engineering types. We have two "steam" plants here and one even burns oil, though no oil preheating is required, this stuff flows downhill by itself. The smell should be familar. The other "steam" plant has a decent stack to it, unfortunately no black with some soot discharge, this is more blue with ashy discharge. Pretty easy to keep "steam" up, and you only need to be concerned with fuel delivery and proper flame retention from October 15th to about May 1st. There are also some rather small but cranky gasoline units that can be a challenge from time to time.

                Unfortunately, the crew rooms being offered, two of them by the way, have windows, do not have metal walls and understandably are not under the water line. And they are a little bigger than 6' by 6', is there a potential phobia about spaces being too big? And there is no vibration involved. The ability to wash your own clothes is a plus. Also the abilty to look repeatedly at slides and dvd's of past cruises without requiring to be handcuffed to a chair, while also listening to stories repeated over and over that always start: "Remember when...?" are huge pluses. And the walls in some spaces are decorated with pictures and momentos that should be soothing to the eye. However, any questions starting with "where did you get this...?" will be immediate grounds for this adoption to be terminated.

                The music would be a real plus. The neighbors are getting a little tired of hearing the very same Dixieland/Pianobar/Banjo/Calliope/Ragtime/Vaudeville music played loud enough that it starts peeling paint, over and over and over. A new bunch of music numbers may even stop the petition. Not sure about the banjo music though, that seems to bring the petition out the fastest...

                I think we ought to give this a try...

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by Bruno Krause View Post
                  Not sure about the banjo music though, that seems to bring the petition out the fastest...
                  OUCH. Maybe I can play it REALLY soft?

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Really soft banjo music? Is that possible? I'm thinking that would be not unlike a Limited Nuclear War...sorta a contradiction of terms, dontcha think?

                    Besides, the neighbors are quarter mile away and are slowly getting used to my system scaring all the deer and coyotes away, while doing its damnest to soak up all the kilowatts it can. 500 watts a channel with Mardi Gras Mambo? Piece of cake, given big enough cooling fans.

                    Live banjo music, I'm thinking on second thought would be a great thing, bring some culture to the apple orchards.

                    Deb mentioned some other things indigenous to both our Sodus, New York abode and the lake "chalet" that could also be a warm spot to the engineering gurus. Self contained water supply and sanitary disposal systems are available for tinkering with at both destinations. Tinkering usually involves praying, agnostics need not apply.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by Bruno Krause View Post
                      Really soft banjo music? Is that possible? I'm thinking that would be not unlike a Limited Nuclear War...sorta a contradiction of terms, dontcha think?

                      Self contained water supply and sanitary disposal systems are available for tinkering with at both destinations. Tinkering usually involves praying, agnostics need not apply.
                      Hey B,

                      Actually in the real world, one of our guest entertainers, Bobby Horton, plays banjo in a soft, almost soothing style. Beautiful sounds. Now really soft calliope music? never happen.

                      Self contained sanitary disposal systems that involve praying? Hey, Bruno, I lived on the MQ for almost six straight months. You wanna talk praying that the toilet works?

                      Each use was an adventure.

                      Paul

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Fred: This is an interesting and sad thread. I don't know how widely it is known that all that talent has been set adrift. I can relate to that because I once lost my job at this time of year...two little kids looking to the north pole and me looking everywhere. Luckily for me it was short-lived and a part-time in the meantime. You've read Bruno's posting in the past that it is the crew that he misses most. Well, that self-same crew is still out there! Please take my heartfelt wishes for you all to have a good holiday and swift and satisfying employment of your many talents. Good luck, God speed, farewell and keep us posted. Meanwhile, any of you who hafta take a job "up the hill" are welcome to ride in MISSIE ANY time you get lonesome for the river close to Ragtown. Cap'n Walnut

                        Comment


                          #13
                          I would hope that everybody knows what I'm posting is all tongue in cheek...

                          I agree with Tom 100%, this is so sad. I can relate, just like Tom, first week of December 1989 I went from company officier to unemployed in about 6 seconds, and 1989 was a horrible time for the engineering business. Two little kids wondering why I wasn't fun anymore and a wife that was worried about my lack of sleep and my headaches.

                          You crew have an open door and friends here in New York...anytime...You know, I would hope by now, how Deb and I think of you all...

                          Comment


                            #14
                            One of the things I treasure most about my steamboat adventure is the wonderful friendships I have made. I have friends all over the world. Bruno and Deb, you guys are the best!

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Linda & I say the same thing about all of you too. Tom really put things in focus. Our campaign to save the DQ also saves an american tradition, and a way of life for many--plus a source of income too. More reasons that we MUST keep on and get the job done!
                              Our best to everyone out there.
                              S'
                              Linda & David D.

                              Comment

                              ADVERTISEMENT
                              Working...
                              X