Forum

[ Future of the Delta Queen Steamboat Co Boats ]


[Previous Message] [Next Message]

Date: April 13, 2002 at 01:41:44
From: Capt. Mike, [user-vc8f7cq.biz.mindspring.com]
Subject: Steamboats


The day started with moderate rain (which wasn't forecast!) And that made mate Buford mad, because he had planned on completing the paddlewheel paint job. I soothed his temper and the deck crew set about painting in the galley storerooms areas and the crew mess. These areas will look better than they have in ten years when we get finished! At this point, there are no holds barred, and the Magnificient Mississippi Queen will shine when she sails! Today, we flattened the Mississippi Queen against the wharf, by slacking the head lines and taking up on the stern capstan. She had been left kind of haphazardly parked, pivoting on one well worn wharf piling, so we slacked off the twin head lines, and took up on the stern capstain. She was swinging in well and then, all of a sudden, just stopped. I was on the stern working the port stern capstain with DQ deckhands Ronnie Jackson and Ashley Keith, we had a ferocious strain on the stern line, so via , radio, I called mate Buford on the bow. "Buford, slack off dammit, she won't come in any more and we've got 5 feet to go!" The radio crackled to life and Bufords southern drawl reported, "We're slack on the head Capt., she should be comin' in!" I asked everyone to pause for a minute while I investigated the situation. As I walked up the gunwhale from the stern towards the bow, about midships I discoverd a huge treetrunk that had become wedged at an angle between the wharf pilings and the boats hull. I took a spike pole and pushed down against the log, hoping to dislodge it, but no such luck, it was jammmed in tight between the hull of the Mississippi Queen and the wharf. I called for everyone to stand by, and I returned to the stern where I had Ronnie slack off the capstan, allowing the stern to swing out. I told Buford on the bow to hold the head lines, as we didn't want to let the bow get out loose in the fast current.. Gradually, the stern began to swing out, and deckhand Teron Spencer was able to dilodge the huge tree trunk from the hull and the wharf pilings. When he called that the tree was clear, I began to tighten up on the port stern capstan, as Buford slacked off on the twin head lines. The Mississippi Queen gently settled against the wharf with a slight groan, as if relieved from the pressure of swinging back and forth on one piling. Now she rests easily, flat against the wharf, and I feel much better about her now. Moving a vessel that weighs thousands of tons takes some planning, even when not under power,but we now have the best, true river folk here tending the vessels that you can have . It is a great feeling to move a big boat quickly and safely, and with confidence, and that is the way we are proceeding here today at Robin Street Wharf, one day closer to Steamboatin" again!


Posted with TalkShop version 2.71-8

[Previous Message] [Next Message]




Follow Ups:


[ Future of the Delta Queen Steamboat Co Boats ]



 
Copyright by Franz Neumeier