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  1. #1

    Default Steamer Patrick J. Hurley

    Noticed on a You Tube video, a shot of the Patrick J. Hurley. It comes up early in this 1942 10 minute film about Minnesota. It also shows the new lock and dam at Winona. I might have missed it on a previous thread. What ever became of this boat. YouTube - Traveltalks - 1942 Minnesota: Land Of Plenty
    Last edited by Lance Larsen; 04-13-2010 at 12:45 PM. Reason: you tube site did not show up

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    On the "Beautiful Ohio" at New Albany, Indiana, opposite Louisville, Kentucky
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    2,078

    Default

    The steam towboat PATRICK J. HURLEY was built by Dubuque Boat & Boiler in 1930 and was owned by the Federal Barge Lines. She later ran under charter to Mississippi Valley Barge Line, operating on the Upper Mississippi and on the Ohio. The HURLEY was dismantled in 1951. Her engine room telegraph (pilothouse end) was donated to the Missouri Historical Society and for many years was displayed in the River Room at the Jefferson Memorial in Forest Park, St. Louis. Sadly, all of that wonderful collection, including the pilothouse from the Str. GOLDEN EAGLE, is now in storage.
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  3. #3

    Default Jim Hawley- pilot or worker?

    I believe my father-in-law, Jim Hawley was a pilot or worker on the Patrick J Hurley. See attached photo we found in his records. How would I verify this information?
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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Anaheim,Ca
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    46

    Default James W Good

    What became of the James W Good?

  5. #5

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    For years it was at Jeffboat where they used to boilers to steam clean tank barges. When the regs got so restrictive on disposing of the waste, Jeffboat ceased cleaning liquid barges and I think they sold the GOOD.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
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    841

    Default

    Form follows function: ugly from any angle!

  7. #7

    Default

    The paddlewheel looks nice.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Dubuque, Iowa
    Posts
    269

    Default

    Lance,

    The HURLEY was the first of two identical sternwheel towboats built at Dubuque Boat and Boiler in 1930-31, the other being the JAMES W. GOOD. A third boat, the MARK TWAIN, followed in 1932 from the Howard Shipyard in Jeffersonville. All three were built from the same set of plans, provided by the Inland Waterways Corporation, later known as Federal Barge Line. Their hulls were 160 x 42. These three towboats were built to facilitate moving the increased barge traffic on the Upper Mississippi River following the introduction of four smaller, pioneering sternwheelers built for IWC at the Dubuque yards in 1927-1928: the C. C. WEBBER, S. S. THORPE, JOHN W. WEEKS, and GENERAL ASHBURN (hull size 130 x 35). When the S. S. THORPE sank under the Washington Street Bridge in Minneapolis on May 9, 1938, it was the HURLEY who towed her back to Dubuque for repairs. My two uncles got their first river jobs decking on the HURLEY during the Depression years. One of them went on to get his Mate's license; and the other a Master/Pilot license. He worked for Federal Barge Line and then Twin City Barge Line on the Upper Mississippi until his death in the 70s.

    All of these Federal Barge Line sternwheelers wintered in the Ice Harbor at Dubuque. It was quite an impressive line-up to see them all laid up for the winter, side-by-side, as shown in the thumbnail photo below. In that photo you see (from L to R) the HURLEY, GOOD, WEBBER, THORPE, and WEEKS. The location you're looking at was just below the site of the marine ways where they were all built, and where the Iowa Iron Works launched the hull of the giant steamer SPRAGUE in 1902. Today, this site is part of the National Mississippi River Museum and Aquarium campus. If you would like more information on these steamers, I would suggest two books. Unfortunately, the first one, From Canoe to Steel Barge on the Upper Mississippi by Mildred Hartsough is long, long out of print. The other may be somewhat easier to find: it is called the Geo. M. Verity Story and used to be sold on that boat which now serves as a museum in Keokuk. Your correspondent for this posting was the author of that little booklet. Hope this provides you with some background on these pioneering sternwheelers. Interestingly enough, the year after the HURLEY and GOOD were launched, the Dubuque yards also launched the largest Diesel screw wheel boat of her day, the HERBERT HOOVER. Alan's comment is right on target -- they possessed no grace and charm of any kind, but they did get the job of shoving barges on this shallow, twisting river done well. If you want to see a more classic design for a sternwheel towboat used up here in that period, take a look at the ALEXANDER MACKENZIE.
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  9. #9

    Default

    David, Thanks for all the info on this group of sternwheel towboats. It sounds like they were real workhorses of the river in their day.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    841

    Default

    Government-designed river vessels seldom looked good. The architects and engineers belonged to the Hellferstrong School and the Formfollowsfunction design discipline. As a result they lacked grace of line. Many had absolutely no sheer and lacked composition and rhythm of masses. Those fiddleys over the boilers are a good example. When they bought shipyard design services the results were much prettier and just as efficient. Alexander Mackenzie was designed by the Marietta Manufacturing Company.

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