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Thread: Inclinometers , Where They Used On ...............

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  1. #1
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    I presenbtly live in Covington , LA.
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    Default Inclinometers , Where They Used On ...............

    Greetings From New Orleans ,
    Trivia Question ; Were Inclinometers used on the early steamboats to determine if they were properly loaded to avoid either a port or starb'd list ? For that matter if they were not , then by what means were the old river steamers loaded to prevent this situation from arising ? Even on the high tech and sophiscated ships that I go on today I will see an Inclinometer not only on the Bridge of the ship but in both the Captain's quarters and Chief Mate's office as well . Food for thought ??
    Smooth Sailing !
    Ted Davisson

  2. Default

    Ted,

    I don't know about the old boats, but I have one on the Magnolia Belle. It is one of the old antique brass reproductions inclinometers you can find at any pleasue boat store like West Marine. The way it is mounted it has been there a while. I don't know if Dennis Trone put it there or Lloyd Poore, but it works and reads perfectly. I don't know if you remember business partner Capt Walter Thornhill, but he is a retired tanker captain and currently a marine surveyor and he put it to the test one day. We did our own stability test when we first bought the boat and not only was it perfectly placed, but it was 100% correct. It has been very helpful to me during various cruises and also for all the stuff I have stored in the cargo hold.

    Joe

  3. #3
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    I have seen plumb bobs hung in several enginerooms. Engineers were particularly concerned because a list could cause the flues in the high-side boiler to be exposed. I seem to recall a brass arrow mounted on a stanchion on the Island Queen. It had a "multiplier," so to speak. The weight and the arrow were hung on different centers to make the arrow move further than the weight. The arrow moved from side to side in time with the pitmans and cranks.

  4. #4
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    On the break bulk ship I was on which was built in the 1950's it had one of the most interesting "computers" stored away and forgotten that I found while cleaning out an old supply closet. It was an big old oak box and inside was a model of the ship with all the compartments labeled, it came complete with a set of lead weights, each one with a different value, and the model was built ontop of springs so that as you placed the different "loads" you could see how the ship "balanced out". Simple yet I'm sure it got the job done.

  5. #5
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    Default

    That's a hard one to top, and most interesting to hear. Our boat has a curved bubble level in the engine room and none in the pilothouse.

    I'd bet those old-time steamboat Mates could keep a boat in trim by instinct alone. Cap'n Bates' input about hanging a plumb bob in the ER was probably the case on the old-tyme steamboat.

  6. #6

    Default

    Shipyard....you're probably right the old time mates relied on instinct and feel. Anyone who has been around a particular boat long enough knows how she feels and anything the slightest out of normal requires checking into. That's one of my curiosities, why the night the BELLE sank didn't the watchman feel the boat was out of trim..the angle of the stairs had to feel different long before the main deck became awash.
    Remember the big brass inclinometer on the bulkhead in the engineroom of the DQ, is it still there?

  7. #7
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    There is still an inclinometer on the forward bulkhead of the engine room. Technically its the electrical switch panel, not the bulkhead, and its not brass, so my guess is this is a new one.....newer than the one you speak of anyhow.

  8. #8
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    Default Just A Few Shots Of A Modern Day Inclinometer .

    Greetings From New Orleans ,
    Today I am on a modern day ship and what we refer to as a " Bulker " due to the fact that this ships is designed to load and handle bulk mater which could include anything from grain to cement to break cargo . During the course of the trip I took a few shots of this particular ship's Inclinometer . Actually , this particular ship , the M/S/ UBC Baton Rouge was equiped with two inclinometers and was located on the forward overhead bulkhead . There were two other indicators located adajacent to and alongside the inclinometer which was the Rudder Angle Indicator on the left and on the far right was the Engine RPM Indicator . Some ships have these indicators where these were and some have them actually protruding from the forward ceiling inorder to provide 360 degree visibility .
    Hoipe you enjoy !
    Smooth Sailing !
    Ted Davisson



    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Davisson View Post
    Greetings From New Orleans ,
    Trivia Question ; Were Inclinometers used on the early steamboats to determine if they were properly loaded to avoid either a port or starb'd list ? For that matter if they were not , then by what means were the old river steamers loaded to prevent this situation from arising ? Even on the high tech and sophiscated ships that I go on today I will see an Inclinometer not only on the Bridge of the ship but in both the Captain's quarters and Chief Mate's office as well . Food for thought ??
    Smooth Sailing !
    Ted Davisson
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  9. #9
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    Waco, TX
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    Interesting that the needles on the Clinometer are [U]both[U]showing 5 degrees.

  10. #10
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    Huh? I'm seeing about a 1 degree list to stabbard in the third pic with the red needles indicating a range of about five degrees to either side, I'm assuming that any list within those ranges are acceptable, but a list of 5 degrees, or more, falls in the danger (red) zone.

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