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  1. #1
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    Default DK whistle today

    Just emailed me from one of our observant lurkers:
    A Whistling Salute - TimesLeaderOnline.com | News, Sports, Jobs and Community Info for Belmont County - Times Leader
    Bobby Harrison is the owner of the CHRIS GREENE hull - and also the TOM GREENE, which he scrapped several years ago. The CHRIS is a 'flower bed' on his property. Keith and I have posted pictures previously of our visits up there, including the one right before the TG was cut up.
    Thanks, anonymous observant lurker in Marco Island Florida for finding that article so quickly!!!!!!

  2. #2
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    Great find!!!! Was anyone on the boat during that event that remembers hearing a similar whistle response and wondering what it was? I would imagine that was an eerie response to hear after the Queen blasted her whistle for those onboard.

  3. #3

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    I have my doubts about the whistle in the article actually being the DK's whistle. It seems to me as if Fred Way once wrote that the Delta boats' whistles were stock items from Lunkenheimer and could be ordered out of their catalogue. Also by the time the DK was revived as a floating attraction, none of the photos that I've seen of her show any signs of her whistle. Heck, even the bronze balustrade of her grand staircase was removed and sold for scrap. I do trust the Vancouver museum folks though whom told me, yes we have her whistle, but it's not on current display.

  4. #4
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    Frank, I had heard the same thing about the DQ's whistle being from stock. Don't know about that whistle per se, but I have seen 3-chime, single barrel Lunkenheimer whistles in industrial catalogues with a chart showing various sizes, etc.

    There is (was) a factory whistle somewhere in Memphis that is exactly the same; when the weather was just right, I could sometimes hear it at our old house. As you can imagine, it sent chills down my spine!

  5. #5
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    Default DK items

    Bob, I would go nuts if that factory whistle were around here! As to whether or not the whistle Bobby Harrison has is from the DK, who knows... just as the pile of stuff at the upper end of the Robin Street wharf several years ago was reputed to be from the DK, along with a set of Corps engines (none of this is there now). I guess I'd be skeptical of original DK stuff, as I'd think anything the Greenes bought is probably on the DQ by now, and what wasn't brought to the Ohio then could be anywhere, including scrapped or as Frank said in a museum.
    One question regarding something in a museum: if indeed the DK whistle was in storage and unwanted in the Vancouver museum, would they be able to sell it? I didn't think museums or libraries could sell off unwanted property, at least if it had been donated. If they had purchased it, I suppose it could be resold. Does any colleague not boycotting .org know the legal aspects of disposing of museum artifacts?

  6. #6
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    RE: DQ whistle/'De-accession' by museums:
    Steamboating colleagues:
    'Off line' for some weeks but now back with new wireless system up here on the shores of northern Lake Michigan. I'm gradually pawing through postings to catch up--especially off-line messages here I'm just answering. Also rushed north to attend an in-law nearly killed in an auto/bicycle accident. Miracles happen and all fine now with rapid recovery.

    I don't know the 'Ins' and 'Outs' RE: the DQ whistle. I do know that, as is stated correctly above, John Burns informed me directly that the whistles were "stock items" as his dad ordered. John didn't remember the name of the company but said he could "find it in dad's papers." Lunkenheimer is correct according to him. John had just about every copy of an order made for materials, fixtures etc. his dad placed. Old Jim Burns 'shopped' for the best materials at the best prices. The construction of the DK/DQ rather standard in approach by Jim at the time.

    Judy's question RE: museums disposing of materials/objects right on the money. I don't know ALL the legal answers but 'think' I can pull from my foggy brain up here in the north some thoughts.

    *Policies of museum 'accession' and 'de-accession' of collections in the form of art works, manuscripts, 'relics,' ephemera etc. isn't as iron-clad as we think. Keith knows more about the policies of the Howard Museum--and they vary in scope and mission statement. Usually once an 'item' is accepted and deposited the donator signs off officially and very LEGALLY on the line relinquishing any previous ownership, control, authority. Some may make cash grants to house the item or collection. Museums, archives, libraries, depositories may accept or refuse according to the nature of their collection and mission. A number of people have been brought up short demanding a return of items or collections.

    The art world recently has been surprised to learn that some leading museums have 'de-accessed' items in the collection for: 1. Too many items/objects of the same nature. 2. Not in keeping with the main collection body. 3. Need to 'trade' other museums to enrich the collection. 4. Need to 'dispose' of some objects on the market to raise cash for expansions or purchase of other more worthy objects or art. My list could go on but I'll stop here. Heirs and descendents haven't a leg to stand on in demanding return of a collection or object to an institution if it was formally signed off for deposit with supplied copies on file. We won't even get into the U.S. IRS TAX regulations and 'bite' on this. 'Beauty and value are at times in the eye of the beholder.'

    From northern Lake Michigan,
    R. Dale Flick

  7. #7
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    Dale, this sounds right to me, too, though I have no experience with museums per se. To me, a gift is a gift -- the recipient can do with it what he or she or it pleases.

  8. #8
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    At the Howard Steamboat Museum, our DEED OF GIFT document, which donors are required to sign when donating ANYTHING to the museum, plainly spells out that the museum becomes the SOLE owner of the artifact(s) and legally has the right to display, store, sell, discard or whatever. To my knowledge, we've had only one occurrence where a donor asked for something back because it wasn't on display -- and that demand was unanimously denied by the board of directors.

    During my tenure on the board in the early 1990's we came up with such policy as the museum was too fast become a "dumping ground" for anything and everything that people in the area wanted to dispose of. If it was "old", they thought the Howard Museum was the ideal place for it! We ended up with a LOT of JUNK that had no relevance to our mission whatsoever. And our storage space is so limited that we have to be careful of what we can and cannot properly maintain.

    Many museums DE-accession items from time to time and have "yard sales" to benefit their operating fund. We are considering one in the future at the Howard Museum -- and goodness knows we are long overdue for it!

  9. #9
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    *'More' on Museum Policies.*
    Bob & steamboating colleagues:
    My examples as shared above may 'not' apply to all museums, historical sites, archives, libraries etc. Institutions today--like the rest of society--are worried about later 'legal' issues over acquisitions and 'de-accessions.' The wishes/desires of well-meaning donators can't always be granted. Most great world collections can only display around 1/10th of their entire holdings with much going for years never seeing the light of day. The Smithsonian, Russian Hermitage and state collections of the old Austro-Hungarian Empire in Vienna just a few examples. Another matter is the identification of 'bogus' items not being what they were thought to be or are forgeries. Several of us here recall being shown a small porcelain plate bearing a side view of the Str. ROBT. E. LEE. Obious to the untrained eye it wasn't more than a couple of years old of dubious origin--probably Asia. A museum curator friend of mine often says, "If it doesn't LOOK right, FEEL right or the price is TOO good to be true, it isn't RIGHT."

    Cincinnati's famed Taft Museum at Lytle Park in the mansion is based entirely on the collections of Charles and Anna Sinton Taft in fine European paintings, Asian art, American furniture etc. I know of only two acquisitions in European paintings accepted by the Taft outside of these perameters and that was due to the 'donor' being a relative of the Taft family. I have no knowledge at this moment of other policies of large maritime museums and repositories.

    'Recipients' at times may do as they please--but not always. Depends on the basics of their museum and mission statement as mentioned above. Bob, you know of my work/research in Copyright (C) law. Strange, but just because one of us 'finds,' 'rescues,' 'purchases' a letter or document penned by, say, Mark Twain, doesn't give us all rights therin according to the Twain estate. All we really 'own' is the paper on which the ink is placed and not always the rights to the content or message. This may include photos registered with (C) by the photographer. I think this was discussed some months back on the web.
    Well, what do I know?

    Shores of northern Lake Michigan,
    R. Dale Flick

  10. #10

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    Hi all,

    I like Bob Harrison and I like his boat (SEWICKLEY), but that isn't the DK's whistle. If the article is the one I've seen with a picture of the whistle you will notice that the whistle bowl is threaded not flanged. Both the Delta boats had flanged whistle bowls as did most of the single bell triple chime lunkenheimers used for marine applications. I've heard that there were up to 20 different bell length combinations used for Lunkenheimers 10" chimes. I've heard a bunch of 10" Lunks and none of the ones I've heard are exact matches to the DQ whistle. Sure would be nice if the folks up North could provide photographic proof they have the real DK whistle.

    Since Dale's been absent, "well what do I know".

    Aaron

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