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-   -   More Pictures Added on FAcebook (http://www.steamboats.org/forum/save-delta-queen/5399-more-pictures-added-facebook.html)

Mike Washenko 05-31-2015 09:25 AM

More Pictures Added on FAcebook
 
3 Attachment(s)
23 new pictures of the ongoing restoration have been posted on Facebook, work is progressing nicely. For those of you not on Facebook I've attached the maximum number of pictures the system will let me do.

Jo Ann Schoen 05-31-2015 12:23 PM

I had become a lurker due to the amount of overtime required at work. But I've had to log back on to say publicly how encouraging the news from the DELTA QUEEN has been for the last several months, from the purchase by folks who care, Cornel and Cindy Martin, Randy and Leah Ann Ingram, Mike and Liz, Dean and his wife, etc., to these photos of the special care and work being done to her by Captain Mike and his crew, and all in between who are making this possible. What a glorious day! As Steamboat Mary always says, she draws to her who she needs. How true! Hopefully one of the last the hurdles will be history soon, in that Congress will do the right thing and grant the exemption she needs to run again. Many, many thanks to all involved in bringing this last authentic steampowered overnight passenger boat back to life again. We loved Chattanooga and the nice folks who cared for her there, but this new chapter is exciting beyond words! Long Live the DELTA QUEEN!

Jim Reising 06-01-2015 09:09 AM

Just Curious
 
I once helped rehab a porch on an older, Victorian home. The floor on the porch was made of tongue and groove wood. What we found was back when the house was built, the wood was milled to a true 1" thickness, the wood today is milled to about 3/4" thickness (kinda like today a 5lb bag of sugar contains 4 lbs). We had to get specially milled tongue and groove to replace the rotten wood in the porch. Has the DQ rehab run into this kind of problem?

Mike Washenko 06-01-2015 12:54 PM

My guess would be yes based on my working on my 1885 house but the person who would know best is Capt. Mike Williams. Hopefully he'll see this post and fill us all in. I'd also venture to guess that the same thickness problem is on the siding that was replaced.

carole matthews 06-01-2015 01:14 PM

Delta Queen Boards
 
Mike Hello I posted the board comments with thickness on the comment site for the DQ an I know they read these often so I am hoping they will see it. I did it 4 hours ago. Carole M from Sunny Pompano Beach Fla 90 degrees here

Phillip Johnson 06-03-2015 10:15 AM

[QUOTE=Jim Reising;34704]I once helped rehab a porch on an older, Victorian home. The floor on the porch was made of tongue and groove wood. What we found was back when the house was built, the wood was milled to a true 1" thickness, the wood today is milled to about 3/4" thickness (kinda like today a 5lb bag of sugar contains 4 lbs). We had to get specially milled tongue and groove to replace the rotten wood in the porch. Has the DQ rehab run into this kind of problem?[/QUOTE]

Jim,

When speaking with Captain Mike yesterday about how the boat is progressing and such, I posed your question to him. He provides the following:

"We were able to find tongue and groove wood of the correct thickness, which is referred to as 5/4" (in reality is is 1-1/8"), but it was not of the correct width.

Our ships carpenter, DJ, who is quite the skilled craftsman, then took the planks and ripped them down to the correct width, and cut the grooves back in using the on-board table saw."

Given Captain Mike's long history with the boat, and the fact he began his career on her as the boat's carpenter in 1980, hes just the man for the job and knows where to look and find the correct materials.

So in short...yes we have run into "issues" finding the correct wood, but nothing that hasn't been easily overcome.

David Dewey 06-03-2015 11:38 AM

This is extremely reassuring news to me. I was somewhat concerned when I saw the beam replacement is pressure treated wood. Modern lumber is nothing like what was used in 1927.
Now, being the picky person I am, I am hoping they aren't using phillips head screws on any visible fasteners (yes, I know I saw many of them on her back when we rode her & it bothered me then). Phillip head screws did not come into use until 1934, and then almost entirely used on automobiles. I used to restore Rolls-Royces, so I KNOW I am very picky about such details. We would have to line up the slots on the screws so they all matched even! (required careful shimming sometimes)

Jim Reising 06-03-2015 05:37 PM

From the pictures, it looks like they are doing an excellent job with the restoration, I really was just curious if there was a difference in wood then and now and how they dealt with the differences.
The Big E himself, Capt. Wagner, was amazed at the quality of the wood used in the original construction and how well it held up as opposed to the materials used in the conversion at Dravo in 1947. Even in 1967 the wood used by Dravo on the boiler and texas deck extensions was starting to rot while not a stick of original construction wood had deteriorated.


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